Cover image for Kwanzaa crafts : gifts and decorations for a meaningful and festive celebration
Title:
Kwanzaa crafts : gifts and decorations for a meaningful and festive celebration
Author:
McNair, Marcia Odle.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
New York : Sterling Publishing, [1998]

©1998
Physical Description:
127 pages : color illustrations ; 27 cm
General Note:
Includes index.
Language:
English
ISBN:
9780806917771
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Central Library TT900.K92 M38 1998 Adult Non-Fiction Non-Fiction Area-Holiday
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Central Library TT900.K92 M38 1998 Adult Non-Fiction Non-Fiction Area-Holiday
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Frank E. Merriweather Library TT900.K92 M38 1998 Adult Non-Fiction Black History Non-Circ
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Frank E. Merriweather Library TT900.K92 M38 1998 Current Holiday Item Oversize
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East Delavan Branch Library TT900.K92 M38 1998 Adult Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Summary

Summary

Drape your home in the traditional African red, green, and black, and celebrate Kwanzaa in high style with this brightly illustrated collection of stories, crafts, poetry, and recipes. It goes day by day, presenting the principles, symbols, and candles for each. On the first strive for umoja: unity in the family, community, nation, and race. Light a black candle, and set out a mazao, or basket of fruits, vegetables, and nuts -- which you can make yourself, along with a delicious Nigerian Mango salad. Instructions cover wreaths, a colorful kente-cloth tunic top, a mkeka or woven-straw placemat, a Kwanzaa banner, scrapbook, and decoupaged kinara -- the ritual candleholder. With these glorious projects you're sure to remember the principle of the sixth day: Kuumba -- or creativity!


Reviews 1

Booklist Review

Beginning the day after Christmas, Kwanzaa is a seven-day African American festival, created in 1966, that restores and reinforces principles of the true holiday season. Here, a New York educator-artist defines each day with the principle, its candle color, symbol, a descriptive story or poem, and a bunch of make-it-now crafts. None of the more than 55 projects will challenge either fingers or imaginations; most demand very unsophisticated knowledge and equipment. Finishing the jungle platter, for instance, requires tissue paper, artwork, a green wooden plate, different kinds of paper, and decoupage. Recipes, too, are easy to imitate, from banana bread as a gift to rice and black-eyed peas eaten on New Year's Day for good luck. Illustrations, including photographs, capture the spirit; only a few projects are not accompanied by visuals. --Barbara Jacobs


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