Cover image for Warfare in the Renaissance world
Title:
Warfare in the Renaissance world
Author:
Brewer, Paul.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
Austin, TX : Raintree Steck-Vaughn, 1999.
Physical Description:
80 pages : illustrations (some color), color maps ; 24 cm.
Summary:
Describes the widespread changes in the conduct of war that occurred in the 200 years between the beginning of the sixteenth century and the end of the seventeenth century.
Language:
English
ISBN:
9780817254445
Format :
Book

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Central Library U39 .B74 1999 Adult Non-Fiction Central Closed Stacks
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Hamburg Library U39 .B74 1999 Adult Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Kenmore Library U39 .B74 1999 Adult Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Summary

Summary

Ten titles describe the causes, consequences, strategies, weaponry, and key figures of warfare from ancient times to the present. Authentic photographs of modern wars transport the reader to battlefields and war-torn countries. Illustrations help readers visualize uniforms, weapons, and battlefield scenes of bygone years. Details of important campaigns are presented in boxed sidebars.


Reviews 1

School Library Journal Review

Gr 7-10-Even though these series titles present straightforward descriptions of wars, who fought them, and how, why is a question that might occur to many readers. Nowhere is there any discussion of the social and economic factors that gave rise to fighting. Ancient World covers the rise and fall of empires and dynasties from Egypt through the Roman Empire. Specific battles, from Kadesh to Cannae, are described with accompanying diagrams. This pattern is repeated in Medieval World and Renaissance World, but the authors' dry and academic descriptions fail to capture the drama (and also the chaos, blood, and degradation) of battle. Especially in the latter two books, the texts get bogged down in complicated political background without ever helping readers grasp the significance of the events being described. One comes away from reading about the Hundred Years War or the Thirty Years War without much understanding of how these conflicts influenced the course of history. The emphasis in all three books is on European wars. A token chapter at the end of each one acknowledges that the other parts of the world witnessed major conflicts, but little detail is provided. Discussions of weapons and tactics presume a background in military history. Well-placed, full-color maps and reproductions add some attraction, as do good bibliographies. Peter Connolly's Greece and Rome at War (Stackpole, 1998) is a better choice for understanding ancient warfare, especially in the classical Mediterranean world.-David N. Pauli, Portland Jewish Academy, OR (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


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