Cover image for The garden party and other plays
Title:
The garden party and other plays
Author:
Havel, Václav.
Personal Author:
Uniform Title:
Plays. Selections. English
Edition:
First Grove Press edition.
Publication Information:
New York : Grove Press, 1993.
Physical Description:
273 pages ; 21 cm
Language:
English
Contents:
The garden party -- The memorandum -- The increased difficulty of concentration -- Audience (Conversation) -- Unveiling (Private view) -- Protest -- Mistake.
ISBN:
9780802133076
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Central Library PG5039.18.A9 A2 1993 Adult Non-Fiction Non-Fiction Area
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Central Library PG5039.18.A9 A2 1993 Adult Non-Fiction Central Closed Stacks
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Summary

Summary

Gathered together here for the first time are seven plays that span Havel's career from his early days at the Theater of the Balustrade through the Prague Spring, Charter 77, and the repeated imprisonments that made Havel's name into a rallying cry and propelled him to the leadership of his country. They include The Garden Party, The Increased Difficulty of Concentration, Mistake, the Vanek trilogy of Audience, Unveiling, and Protest, and the first fully corrected English version of The Memorandum--the play that won Havel the Obie for Best Foreign Play in 1968.


Author Notes

Considered one of the leading intellectual figures and moral forces in Eastern Europe today, Vaclav Havel was born into a well-to-do Prague family on October 5, 1936. Denied the right to attend the university college because of his "bourgeois" background, Havel instead studied at a technical college from 1955 to 1957, and then enlisted in the Czechoslovak Army.

Havel left the army in 1959 and began a career in writing. He took a job as a resident writer for the Prague Theatre on the Balustrade in 1960 and wrote his first play, The Garden City, three years later. Wanting to learn more about the craft that he now considered a full-time career, Havel enrolled in the Academy of Dramatic Arts, graduating in 1967. Two years later Havel's passport was revoked because the government considered his writings to be subversive.

As an essayist, Havel has written the books Disturbing the Peace: A Conversation with Karel Hvizdal; Living in the Truth; Open Letters: Selected Prose 1965-1990; and Temptation. From 1979 to 1982, while in prison for subversion, Havel wrote a number of letters to his wife, Olga Splichalova. In 1983 those correspondences formed Havel's book Letters to Olga.

On December 29, 1989, Vaclav Havel was elected President of Czechoslovakia. He resigned in 1992, only to be elected the president of the newly formed Czech Republic in 1993. Havel has been the recipient of more than a dozen honorary degrees.

(Bowker Author Biography)


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