Cover image for Publish and be murdered
Title:
Publish and be murdered
Author:
Edwards, Ruth Dudley.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
Scottsdale, AZ : Poisoned Pen Press, 1999.

©1998
Physical Description:
217 pages ; 22 cm.
Language:
English
ISBN:
9781890208134
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Central Library X Adult Fiction Central Closed Stacks
Searching...

On Order

Summary

Summary

Robert Amiss, lapsed civil servant, is approached by Lord Papworth, owner of the Wrangler, to step in as business manager for the august journal and do something about its steady drain on his lordship's finances. The magazine's editor, Willie Lambie Crump, and his staff are firmly mired in the 1950s, technologically speaking; ideologically, the journal has always been strongly conservative. Prodded by Baroness "Jack" Troutbeck, his rather menacing guardian angel, Amiss takes on the job and soon has his hands full trying to further the journal's progress toward the latter half of the 20th century without unduly upsetting the staff. When the political editor, Henry Potbury, is found dead under odd circumstances and Crump is murdered, Amiss discovers once again that trying to keep a job can be a lethal occupation.


Author Notes

Ruth Dudley Edwards (born 24 May 1944, in Dublin, Ireland) is an Irish historian, a crime novelist, a journalist and a broadcaster, in both Ireland and in the United Kingdom. Edwards was born and brought up in Dublin and educated at University College Dublin, Girton College, Cambridge and Wolfson College, Cambridge. Her nonfiction books include An Atlas of Irish History, James Connolly, Victor Gollancz: A Biography (winner of the James Tait Black Memorial Prize), The Pursuit of Reason: The Economist 1843-1993, and The Faithful Tribe: An Intimate Portrait of the Loyal Institutions. Also a crime fiction writer, her novels include: Corridors of Death, The Saint Valentine's Day Murders, The English School of Murder, and Clubbed to Death.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 2

Booklist Review

Although the title of this delightful British cozy is uninspired, those who pick it up are in for a happy surprise. Robert Amiss, an affable man with no long-term career prospects, accepts an assignment to manage the Wrangler, a right-wing political journal, and "gently" bring it into the twentieth century. Lord Papworth, its kindly, devoted owner, wants to accomplish this transformation without upsetting the loyal (and decidedly odd) staff. As Amiss begins his new job, he encounters the strange workforce, which includes a drunk, a senile old man, a hypochondriac, a Muslim receptionist, and sundry others, all of whom hate the simpering editor, Willie Lambie Crump. Adding to the mix are Amiss' friend, the feisty Baroness Troutbeck, and his girlfriend, Rachel, an enemy of the Wrangler's politics. Although a murder does not occur until halfway through the book, readers will be too busy enjoying the characters' interaction to notice. Fans of eccentric British characters (ala P. G. Wodehouse) will especially enjoy this witty romp. (Reviewed March 15, 1999)1890208132Jenny McLarin


Publisher's Weekly Review

In his seventh outing, Robert Amiss, lapsed civil servant, is approached by Lord Papworth, owner of the Wrangler, to step in as business manager for the august journal and do something about its steady drain on his lordship's finances. The magazine's editor, Willie Lambie Crump, and his staff are firmly mired in the 1950s, technologically speaking; ideologically, the journal has always been strongly conservative. Prodded by Baroness "Jack" Troutbeck, his rather menacing guardian angel, Amiss takes on the job and soon has his hands full trying to further the journal's progress toward the latter half of the 20th century without unduly upsetting the staff. When the political editor, Henry Potbury, is found dead under odd circumstances and Crump is murdered, Amiss discovers once again that trying to keep a job can be a lethal occupation. Edwards's (Clubbed to Death, etc.) wit should be registered as a deadly weapon. This longtime contributor to the Economist takes no prisoners in yet another savagely funny satire on journalism, politics and antiquated manners. (Mar.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


Google Preview