Cover image for Don't count the candles : just keep the fire lit
Title:
Don't count the candles : just keep the fire lit
Author:
Rivers, Joan.
Personal Author:
Edition:
First edition.
Publication Information:
New York : HarperCollins Publishers, 1999.
Physical Description:
vii, 194 pages ; 22 cm
Language:
English
Subject Term:
ISBN:
9780060183837
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Concord Library PN6231.A43 R58 1999 Adult Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Kenmore Library PN6231.A43 R58 1999 Adult Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Anna M. Reinstein Library PN6231.A43 R58 1999 Adult Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Summary

Summary

The popular comedienne takes a whimsical look at the problems of aging and offers sensible advice on such topics as fashion, makeup, exercise, sex, diet, and attitude.


Author Notes

Joan Rivers was born in Brooklyn, New York on June 8, 1933. She received a bachelor's degree in English literature and anthropology from Barnard College in 1954. She was a comedienne, actress, author, television talk show host, jewelry designer, and cosmetic company entrepreneur. As an actress, Rivers has appeared in the movie Spaceballs and the animated children's series Arthur. She won an Emmy Award for Outstanding Talk Show Host in 1990 for The Joan Rivers Show. She was the co-host of Fashion Police and starred in the reality show,Joan and Melissa: Joan Knows Best?

Rivers wrote several books including The Life and Hard Times of Heidi Abramowitz, Men Are Stupid and They Like Big Boobs: A Woman's Guide to Beauty Through Plastic Surgery, Murder at the Academy Awards, I Hate Everyone... Starting with Me, and Diary of a Mad Diva. She also created the Joan Rivers Classics Collection of fashion jewelry and the Joan Rivers Beauty line of products.

Rivers died a few days after going into cardiac and respiratory arrest during a medical procedure on September 4, 2014 at the age of 81.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 3

Booklist Review

Joan Rivers has advice for every occasion--and her cable TV fans seem eager to listen. After being widowed, she wrote a book about bouncing back. Recently, she wrote a book for her recently wed daughter, the ubiquitous Melissa, on marriage. Now, she tackles getting old. The advice she gives is familiar--get involved, have sex, don't retire from life--except here it is punctuated with one-liners. Joan also seems to have found a copy Bartlett's and looked up aging because every chapter is filled with quotes about growing old from such disparate sources as Brigitte Bardot and British writer Anthony Powell. No shrinking violet when it comes to giving advice on anything, Joan is particularly adamant about one subject close to her heart (and her skin): have cosmetic surgery now! If you are over 40, she scolds, this means you: "I don't consider it an option, I consider it an obligation." Anyone who has seen Joan lately knows she has taken these words to heart. Yet for all her attempts to fight the war against aging, even Rivers knows that in the end, it is a losing battle: "There is nothing funny about aging. It is rotten and depressing." Still, she wants herself and others to get through it with "dignity." And a tummy tuck, of course. --Ilene Cooper


Publisher's Weekly Review

In this new book about aging, stand-up comic and talk show host Rivers combines her two most marketable talents: snappy wit and common sense. Returning to the self-help genre, which she successfully mastered in Bouncing Back and From Mother to Daughter, she intersperses a seemingly endless supply of jokes (some laugh-out-loud funny, many provoking a smile or a groan) with practical, intelligent and easy-to-follow advice on coping with getting older. Most of the counsel is the stuff of magazine articles: exercise regularly; watch your diet; dress well to feel better; use cosmetics; and keep your home clean and well decorated. There are tips about plastic surgery, making friends, the need to move on after a loss and (more surprisingly) how to date over the Internet, as well as about the benefits of dating younger men. Rivers doesn't aim for the strong, sustained prose of her autobiographical Enter Talking, but manages to entertain and casually inform. There are certainly more serious, comprehensive guides to aging, but Rivers's fans will enjoy this breezy pep talk. (Apr.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


Library Journal Review

Her advice: stay young or die trying. (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


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