Cover image for Kindred nature : Victorian and Edwardian women embrace the living world
Title:
Kindred nature : Victorian and Edwardian women embrace the living world
Author:
Gates, Barbara T., 1936-
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
Chicago : University of Chicago Press, [1998]

©1998
Physical Description:
xi, 293 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm
Language:
English
Contents:
Who can speak in nature's name? -- Retelling the story of science: the wonders of nature -- Cataloging the natural world: case studies of women naturalists -- Nurturing nature -- "Tongues of fire": womanist visions of nature -- Aestheticizing nature -- Hunting and gathering writing -- Storied animals -- Kindred natures: the earthlings.
ISBN:
9780226284422

9780226284439
Format :
Book

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Material Type
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Status
Central Library HQ1595.A3 G37 1998 Adult Non-Fiction Central Closed Stacks
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Summary

Summary

In Kindred Nature, Barbara T. Gates highlights the contributions of Victorian and Edwardian women to the study, protection, and writing of nature. Recovering their works from the misrepresentation they often faced at the time of their composition, Gates discusses not just well-known women like Beatrix Potter but also others--scientists, writers, gardeners, and illustrators--who are little known today.

Some of these women discovered previously unknown species, others wrote and illustrated natural histories or animal stories, and still others educated women, the working classes, and children about recent scientific advances. A number of women also played pivotal roles in the defense of animal rights by protesting overhunting, vivisection, and habitat destruction, even as they demanded their own rights to vote, work, and enter universities.

Kindred Nature shows the enormous impact Victorian and Edwardian women had on the natural sciences and the environmental movement, and on our own attitudes toward nature and human nature.




Summary

In Kindred Nature, Barbara T. Gates highlights the contributions of Victorian and Edwardian women to the study, protection, and writing of nature. Recovering their works from the misrepresentation they often faced at the time of their composition, Gates discusses not just well-known women like Beatrix Potter but also others--scientists, writers, gardeners, and illustrators--who are little known today.

Some of these women discovered previously unknown species, others wrote and illustrated natural histories or animal stories, and still others educated women, the working classes, and children about recent scientific advances. A number of women also played pivotal roles in the defense of animal rights by protesting overhunting, vivisection, and habitat destruction, even as they demanded their own rights to vote, work, and enter universities.

Kindred Nature shows the enormous impact Victorian and Edwardian women had on the natural sciences and the environmental movement, and on our own attitudes toward nature and human nature.




Reviews 2

Booklist Review

Why haven't there been more prominent women scientists? The authors of these two groundbreaking books look to both the past and the present for answers. Eisenhart, an anthropologist of education, and Finkel, a geologist and science education expert, collaborated with three colleagues to study the status of women scientists today. They begin by describing the forces that dissuade girls from pursuing scientific studies, then cite reports that show that those who buck the trend and make it all the way through graduate school are more often than not relegated to supporting roles in traditional institutions, or paid lower salaries than men. But there are alternative paths for women scientists, and most of the book analyzes the dynamic and satisfying careers women have created for themselves in the "margins of established communities of scientific or technical practice." Many important issues and facts are raised and presented here, making the effort to brave the rather arid academic format well worth the effort. Gates, a professor at the University of Delaware, has taken a far more reader-friendly approach to her subject, the invaluable yet long overlooked scientific contributions of nineteenth-century British women naturalists. They had to create their own niche in a misogynist scientific community, and they succeeded brilliantly in several crucial arenas, including the popularization of science, a practice that enabled women writers to reach far greater and more appreciative audiences than most male scientists. Women naturalists were also adept collectors, illustrators, and crusaders for the protection of wildlife and wilderness. In one eye-opening profile after another, Gates presents the lives and achievements of such gifted pioneers as the expert fossil collector Mary Anning, the botanical artist Marianne North, and the mycologist Beatrix Potter, who, frustrated by the repeated rejections of the male scientific establishment, turned to creating her beloved children's books. These are only a few of the remarkable individuals Gates presents in this seminal volume, a reclaiming of a key chapter in the history of science and our understanding of nature. --Donna Seaman


Booklist Review

Why haven't there been more prominent women scientists? The authors of these two groundbreaking books look to both the past and the present for answers. Eisenhart, an anthropologist of education, and Finkel, a geologist and science education expert, collaborated with three colleagues to study the status of women scientists today. They begin by describing the forces that dissuade girls from pursuing scientific studies, then cite reports that show that those who buck the trend and make it all the way through graduate school are more often than not relegated to supporting roles in traditional institutions, or paid lower salaries than men. But there are alternative paths for women scientists, and most of the book analyzes the dynamic and satisfying careers women have created for themselves in the "margins of established communities of scientific or technical practice." Many important issues and facts are raised and presented here, making the effort to brave the rather arid academic format well worth the effort. Gates, a professor at the University of Delaware, has taken a far more reader-friendly approach to her subject, the invaluable yet long overlooked scientific contributions of nineteenth-century British women naturalists. They had to create their own niche in a misogynist scientific community, and they succeeded brilliantly in several crucial arenas, including the popularization of science, a practice that enabled women writers to reach far greater and more appreciative audiences than most male scientists. Women naturalists were also adept collectors, illustrators, and crusaders for the protection of wildlife and wilderness. In one eye-opening profile after another, Gates presents the lives and achievements of such gifted pioneers as the expert fossil collector Mary Anning, the botanical artist Marianne North, and the mycologist Beatrix Potter, who, frustrated by the repeated rejections of the male scientific establishment, turned to creating her beloved children's books. These are only a few of the remarkable individuals Gates presents in this seminal volume, a reclaiming of a key chapter in the history of science and our understanding of nature. --Donna Seaman


Table of Contents

List of Illustrations
Acknowledgments
Introductory Pt.
1 Women on the Edge of Science
1 Who Can Speak in Nature's Name?
2 Retelling the Story of Science: The Wonders of Nature
3 Cataloging the Natural World: Case Studies of Women Naturalists Pt.
2 Nature's Crusaders
4 Nurturing Nature
5 ""Tongues of Fire"": Womanist Visions of Nature Pt.
3 Storied Nature
6 Aestheticizing Nature
7 Hunting and Gathering Writing
8 Storied Animals
9 Kindred Natures: The Earthlings Afterward: An Afterword
Bibliography

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