Cover image for The lost temple of the Aztecs : what it was when the Spaniards invaded Mexico
Title:
The lost temple of the Aztecs : what it was when the Spaniards invaded Mexico
Author:
Tanaka, Shelley.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
New York : Hyperion ; Toronto, Ont. : Madison Press Books, [1998]

©1998
Physical Description:
48 pages : color illustrations ; 24 x 29 cm
Summary:
Uses the discovery of the temple in Mexico City, what was the Aztec city of Tenochtitlan, to introduce the story of the Spanish conquest of Moctezuma and his empire in the sixteenth century.
Language:
English
Reading Level:
860 Lexile.
Program Information:
Accelerated Reader AR MG 6.1 1.0 73098.

Reading Counts RC 3-5 6.7 3 Quiz: 19764.
Added Author:
ISBN:
9780786804412
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Crane Branch Library F1219.73 .T35 1998 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Hamburg Library F1219.73 .T35 1998 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Orchard Park Library F1219.73 .T35 1998 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Williamsville Library F1219.73 .T35 1998 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Julia Boyer Reinstein Library F1219.73 .T35 1998 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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On Order

Summary

Summary

Using the exciting recent discovery and excavation of the Great Temple in Mexico City, this book flashes back four centuries to tell the compelling story of the Spanish conquest of Mexico in vivid and accurate detail, based on Aztec accounts.


Reviews 1

School Library Journal Review

Gr 4-7‘Using the discovery of the Great Temple of Tenochtitlán under the streets of Mexico City in 1978 as a starting point, Tanaka introduces readers to the world of the Aztecs at the time of the Spanish invasion. From this beginning, the readable text follows the fate of this capital city and its inhabitants until its fall and destruction in 1521‘the death knell of an empire. Lavishly illustrated with full-color photos, period artwork, and dramatic full-page paintings, the book is handsome and eye-catching. It includes fictional dialogue and suppositions regarding emotional states, but purists may be comforted by the vetting of Professor Eduardo Matos Moctezuma, both a descendant of an Aztec ruler and the archaeologist in charge of the initial excavation of the Great Temple. Another comforting note indicates that, "The text...is largely based on Aztec accounts...." Sadly, there is no index (or table of contents) to simplify swift information retrieval. Still, this is a colorful, lively addition. Teamed with other works such as Sally Schofer Mathews's eloquent The Sad Night (Clarion, 1994) and Philip Steele's quasi-tabloid The Aztec News (Candlewick, 1997), it may bring a long-ago world into sharp present-day focus.‘Patricia Manning, formerly at Eastchester Public Library, NY (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


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