Cover image for My brother, the pest
Title:
My brother, the pest
Author:
Bernstein, Margery.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
Brookfield, CT : Millbrook Press, 1999.
Physical Description:
31 pages : color illustrations ; 24 cm.
Summary:
A girl has a terrible time getting along with her little sister, who is a pest, but she comes to appreciate her when she needs a playmate to keep her company.
Language:
English
Reading Level:
20 Lexile.
Program Information:
Accelerated Reader AR LG 1.7 0.5 27986.

Reading Counts RC K-2 1.8 1 Quiz: 25469 Guided reading level: F.
Added Author:
ISBN:
9780761320555

9780761320807
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Central Library READER Juvenile Fiction Childrens Area-Readers
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Summary

Summary

A girl has a terrible time getting along with her little sister, who is a pest, but she comes to appreciate her when she needs a playmate to keep her company.


Reviews 2

Booklist Review

Gr. 1^-2. Sibling rivalry is the scenario in this book in the Real Kids Readers series that integrates phonics practice with a realistic rhyming story. The bright, posed photographs with color-coordinated outfits are more like glossy commercials than book illustrations, but new readers will enjoy the older sister's anger about her younger sibling and then her rueful affection ("You know, that kid / is really not bad. / He loves me a lot, / and that makes me glad"). --Hazel Rochman


School Library Journal Review

K-Gr 2-These realistic but uninvolving stories address some of the frustrations and fears of childhood. My Brother, the Pest is narrated in rhyme by a young girl who expresses her annoyance with her little brother until she realizes that they do have some fun together. In Monster Songs, Hal is afraid of the creature that sings under his bed until his brother Jack helps him conquer his nighttime fears. Both titles use a limited vocabulary, making them suitable for beginning readers. Unfortunately, neither book will engage youngsters. The clear, full-color photographs appear staged and add little to the stories.-Lori Haas Weaver, Montmorency County Public Libraries, Atlanta, MI (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


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