Cover image for Windows NT Microsoft cluster server
Title:
Windows NT Microsoft cluster server
Author:
Lee, Richard R.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
Berkeley, Calif. : Osborne/McGraw-Hill, [1999]

©1999
Physical Description:
xxiii, 375 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm
General Note:
Includes index and "Glossary".
Language:
English
ISBN:
9780078825002
Format :
Book

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Call Number
Material Type
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Status
Central Library QA76.76.O63 L435 1999 Adult Non-Fiction Central Closed Stacks
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Summary

Author Notes

Richard Lee is President of Data Storage Technologies, a management and technology consulting firm, with offices in Ridgewood, New Jersey and Banner Elk, North Carolina. He writes frequently for Windows NT Magazine, Selling NT Solutions, Intelligent Enterprise, and InfoStor and is the author of the Windows NT Enterprise Storage Primer, and The Pocket Guide to Digital. His clients include IBM, Digital, Tandem, and others.


Table of Contents

Chapter 1 The Digital Worldp. 1
History of photographyp. 3
The imaging chainp. 5
What is digital anyway?p. 6
Pictures or images?p. 6
How we got from pictures to imagesp. 7
But technology marches onp. 9
Chapter 2 Photographyp. 11
What makes a camera?p. 12
The lensp. 12
The aperturep. 13
Depth of fieldp. 14
Depth of field explainedp. 14
The shutterp. 15
Stopping motionp. 16
Exposurep. 16
Correct exposurep. 17
Filmp. 18
Sharpnessp. 19
Film speedp. 20
Slides ... the first color filmp. 21
Types of film formatsp. 22
Large/Medium formatp. 22
35 mmp. 23
APSp. 24
APS to digitalp. 27
Professional implications of APSp. 28
Film is king ... for a little while stillp. 29
Photographic processingp. 30
Film processingp. 30
Film processorsp. 31
Photographic paperp. 31
Printing photographsp. 32
Enlargersp. 33
Photographic printersp. 33
Paper processingp. 34
An all-in-one solutionp. 35
Enter the minilabp. 35
Photos in an hourp. 35
The less-than-one-hour labp. 36
Going digital ... photographicallyp. 36
Digital photo printersp. 37
The digital-enabled minilabp. 38
Scannersp. 38
CRTsp. 38
Connection to a computerp. 38
Useful informationp. 40
Setting your exposure without a meterp. 40
Chapter 3 Imagingp. 41
Color imaging in the early days (from Gershwin to Disco)p. 41
Color "imaging" before the birth of digitalp. 41
Halftoningp. 42
Halftones are dots of varying sizesp. 42
Dots refer to halftone dotsp. 44
Halftone dot sizep. 44
Halftone dot shapep. 45
The digital revolutionp. 48
A million dollars worth of junkp. 49
Analog vs. digitalp. 49
Analog to digital conversionp. 50
Pixels, spots and dotsp. 51
Pixelsp. 52
Dotsp. 52
Spotsp. 52
Linesp. 52
Image qualityp. 53
Raster file and bitmap filep. 53
What is continuous tone?p. 54
Beyond bitsp. 56
Getting to digitalp. 58
Scannersp. 58
Drum scannersp. 58
Flatbed scannersp. 59
Film scannersp. 60
Hybrid scannersp. 60
Photo CDp. 61
Picture CDp. 62
Capturing imagesp. 63
The CCDp. 63
Three-shot systemsp. 64
Tri-linear arraysp. 65
Three-shot area arraysp. 66
Single-shot area arraysp. 67
CMOSp. 68
Hybrid sensorsp. 70
Bit depthp. 70
Resolution and file sizep. 71
How much is enough?p. 72
Video camerasp. 73
Film recordersp. 75
Helpful informationp. 78
Dynamic rangep. 78
Typical halftone frequenciesp. 78
Photo CD File sizes and usep. 78
Uncompressed 24-bit color (file size in Kbytes)p. 79
Chapter 4 Digital Camerasp. 81
What happens when you push the button?p. 82
Compression, squeezing more pictures into the camerap. 84
JPEGp. 85
FlashPixp. 85
As good as film?p. 88
Quality and features increase, prices decreasep. 89
Camera featuresp. 91
Resolutionp. 91
Zoomp. 91
Accessory lensesp. 92
Filtersp. 93
LCDp. 94
Optical viewfinderp. 95
Flashp. 96
Flash syncp. 97
Memoryp. 98
Removable memoryp. 99
Floppy disksp. 99
Micro disk drivesp. 99
Other removable storagep. 100
Timerp. 100
Multiple photo capturep. 101
Audio annotationp. 102
Text annotationp. 102
Cropp. 103
Macrop. 103
Video-outp. 104
Video-inp. 105
Direct to printerp. 105
Tripod mountp. 106
Image size optionsp. 107
Compressionp. 108
Rechargeable batteryp. 108
Positionable lensp. 112
Image transferp. 113
Direct connectionp. 113
Removable media transferp. 113
Manual exposure/bracketingp. 115
Scriptingp. 115
Digital cameras: the future of photography?p. 116
Digital camera of the year ... the Barbie digital camerap. 116
Chapter 5 Image Manipulationp. 117
Connect your camerap. 117
Serialp. 118
Parallelp. 118
SCSI (Small Computer Systems Interface)p. 118
USB (Universal Serial Bus)p. 119
Don't connect your camerap. 119
Image compressionp. 119
How compression worksp. 120
Lossless compressionp. 120
Lossy compression, the JPEG storyp. 121
File formatsp. 122
Converting between formatsp. 123
Native formatsp. 123
TIFFp. 124
EPSp. 126
JPEGp. 126
GIF (Graphics Interchange Format)p. 126
FlashPixp. 127
To print and beyondp. 127
Preparing an image for e-mail or display on a monitorp. 128
Savingp. 135
Preparing an image for color desktop printingp. 138
Preparing an image for the printing pressp. 143
Recommended refresh rates by tube sizep. 149
Resolution vs. video memory RAM (Mb)p. 150
Chapter 6 Storage and Transferp. 153
Physical space ... your digital filing cabinetp. 153
Hard drivesp. 155
Removable disksp. 155
Small sizep. 156
Medium sizep. 157
Large sizep. 159
Organizational space--finding a needle in a haystackp. 160
Professional-level image databasesp. 162
Consumer-level image databasesp. 162
Creating your own image management systemp. 163
Understanding how to use a databasep. 164
Building your haystackp. 165
Sending your images here and therep. 167
E-mailp. 168
Online providersp. 168
The Internetp. 170
So what does this mean to you?p. 171
Modem-to-modemp. 171
Specialized carriersp. 172
Storage and transfer, the overlooked digital aspectp. 172
Chapter 7 Outputp. 173
Process differencesp. 175
Digital printingp. 176
Variable printingp. 178
On-demand printingp. 178
Distributed printingp. 178
Non-impact printingp. 180
Electrophotographyp. 181
Technologyp. 185
Laser printer, black-and-whitep. 185
Laser printer, colorp. 189
Copier, black-and-whitep. 190
Copier, colorp. 191
Toner-based printingp. 191
Dual-component tonerp. 192
Cascade developmentp. 193
Magnetic brush developmentp. 193
Continuous tone developmentp. 193
Mono-component tonerp. 194
Liquid tonerp. 194
Toner chargep. 195
Toner concentrationp. 195
Xerographic tonerp. 195
Dye sublimation, dye diffusionp. 196
Dye sublimationp. 199
New digital color systemsp. 201
Roll-fed paperp. 204
Indigop. 206
Indigo adds new digital pressesp. 212
Xerox DocuColor 100 Digital Color Pressp. 214
DocuColor 40 advancesp. 214
Canon pioneers mid high-speed color segmentp. 215
IBM launches new Infoprint productsp. 216
High-level digital color printersp. 217
Ion depositionp. 218
Ion deposition principlesp. 218
Continuous inkjet printingp. 221
Two type of inkjet printingp. 225
Technological developments and considerationsp. 227
Desktop inkjet gets down to businessp. 229
Chapter 8 Wide-format printingp. 233
Electrostaticsp. 234
Inkjetp. 235
Piezo drop-on-demand inkjetp. 235
Thermal inkjetp. 236
Phase changep. 236
Inkjet ink for wid-format printersp. 237
Inkjet ink and substratesp. 237
Choosing your substratep. 239
Quality and speed developmentsp. 242
Superwidep. 243
Chapter 9 Color Managementp. 245
The serious color partp. 246
What is color?p. 246
The light sourcep. 247
The objectp. 249
The observerp. 250
3 in 1p. 251
The headaches of digital colorp. 251
From whence we camep. 252
A little color power can be dangerousp. 255
Color management explained (in a nutshell)p. 257
Why yellow isn't yellow isn't yellowp. 258
What is color management anyway?p. 262
Budget color managementp. 264
Step 1 Calibrate and characterize your monitorp. 265
Step 2 Profile the printerp. 265
Step 3 Convert from RGB to CMYKp. 266
Where to from here?p. 267
Chapter 10 Workflowp. 271
Component filesp. 271
Consolidated filesp. 271
Embedded elementsp. 272
Automated systemsp. 273
Why workflow automation?p. 274
Workflow designp. 274
Image manipulationp. 274
Preflightingp. 275
Color managementp. 275
PostScript file creationp. 275
PDF file creationp. 275
Trappingp. 276
Impositionp. 276
RIPp. 276
Proofingp. 277
Correctionsp. 277
Plate outputp. 278
Blueline proofp. 278
Printingp. 278
Storagep. 278
Variable data printingp. 279
The RIPp. 281
RIP evolutionp. 282
Hardware and software RIPsp. 283
PostScript 3p. 283
Extremep. 284
Working with PostScriptp. 285
Producing PostScriptp. 285
PostScript conclusionsp. 287
Creating a PDF filep. 289
Prepress issuesp. 289
Outputp. 290
Workflow modelsp. 290
OPI serversp. 293
Appendixp. 295
Indexp. 299

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