Cover image for The hundred days
Title:
The hundred days
Author:
O'Brian, Patrick, 1914-2000.
Edition:
[Large print edition].
Publication Information:
Thorndike, Me. : Thorndike Press, 1999.

©1998
Physical Description:
460 pages : illustrations ; 23 cm
General Note:
"Thorndike large print Basic series"--T.p. verso.
Language:
English
ISBN:
9780786217489

9780786217496
Format :
Book

Available:*

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Call Number
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Status
Hamburg Library X Adult Large Print Large Print
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Central Library FICTION Adult Large Print - Floating collection Floating Collection - Large Print
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Summary

Summary

Napoleon escapes from Elba, and the fate of Europe hinges on a desperate mission: Stephen Maturin must ferret out the French dictator's secret link to the powers of Islam, and Jack Aubrey must destroy it. Boldly conceived and brilliantly executed, The Hundred Days is Patrick O'Brian's most ambitious novel yet, and surely one of his most rewarding. In this climactic -- but not final -- adventure in the celebrated Aubrey/Maturin series, O'Brian succeeds in grafting his familiar, ever compelling principal characters to an historical event of tumultuous significance: the final defeat of Napoleon. The result is entertainment, excitement, and an intriguing exercise in what if . . . history, all encompassed in a magnificently rounded and complex work of fiction.


Summary

In O'Brian's most ambitious book to date, Napoleon escapes from Elba, and the fate of Europe hinges on a desperate mission: Stephen Maturin must ferret out the French dictator's secret link to the powers of Islam, and Jack Aubrey must destroy it. An intriguing exercise in "what if . . ". history, encompassed in a magnificently rounded and complex work of fiction. Copyright © Libri GmbH. All rights reserved.


Author Notes

Patrick O'Brian is the author of twenty volumes in the highly respected Aubrey/Maturin series of novels.

(Publisher Provided) Patrick O'Brien was born in Ireland in 1914. His education included the Sorbonne.

O'Brian has produced a variety of works, including biographies of Picasso and Sir Joseph Banks and translations of the novels and memoirs of Simone de Beauvoir, but he is best known for the creation of an unlikely pair of Napoleonic War-era heroes in the Aubrey-Maturin Series. British naval officer Jack Aubrey and Irish scholar and physician Stephen Maturin have been featured in more than a novels published in Great Britain (five of which have also appeared in America).

He died on January 2, 2000. (Bowker Author Biography)


Patrick O'Brian is the author of twenty volumes in the highly respected Aubrey/Maturin series of novels.

(Publisher Provided) Patrick O'Brien was born in Ireland in 1914. His education included the Sorbonne.

O'Brian has produced a variety of works, including biographies of Picasso and Sir Joseph Banks and translations of the novels and memoirs of Simone de Beauvoir, but he is best known for the creation of an unlikely pair of Napoleonic War-era heroes in the Aubrey-Maturin Series. British naval officer Jack Aubrey and Irish scholar and physician Stephen Maturin have been featured in more than a novels published in Great Britain (five of which have also appeared in America).

He died on January 2, 2000. (Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 6

Booklist Review

As the latest Aubrey-Maturin adventure opens, Napoleon is reestablishing himself in France, the Allies are mobilizing armies to remove him, newly widowed Stephen Maturin is as good a doctor and as clumsy aloft as ever, and Jack Aubrey is flying a commodore's broad pendant at the head of a motley squadron of frigates and light vessels sent to the Mediterranean. The heroes end up with two missions: prevent the fitting-out of Bonapartist warships in the eastern Mediterranean and intercept a shipment of gold intended to pay Moslem mercenaries to march against Austria and Russia. Employing their own varied skills and the help of a Jewish doctor cum jewel dealer and translator, they survive the perils of the sea, the intrigues of the Arabs, the aggressiveness of hunted lions, and the obtuseness of their own superiors. And, of course, they execute both missions in fine style. O'Brian's is the finest depiction of sailing warfare since C. S. Forester's in the Hornblower tales, and he also brings to life the society of Napoleonic Europe like no one else since Georgette Heyer laid down her writing brush. Not supplying Aubrey-Maturin fandom with this volume would be the equivalent of wantonly stopping the crew's grog, and loud protest, if not outright mutiny, would certainly be the result. --Roland Green


Publisher's Weekly Review

The Aubrey-Maturin series (The Commodore, etc.) nears the two dozen mark the way it began, with colorful historical background, smooth plotting, marvelous characters and great style. The title refers to Napoleon's escape from Elba and brief return to power. Capt. Jack Aubrey must stop a Moorish galley, loaded with gold for Napoleon's mercenaries, from making its delivery. The action takes us into two seas and one ocean and continues nearly nonstop until the climax in the Atlantic. We're quickly reacquainted with the two heroes: handsome sea dog Jack Aubrey, by now a national hero, and Dr. Stephen Maturin, Basque-Irish ship's doctor, naturalist, English spy and hopelessly incompetent seaman. Nothing stays the same, alas: Jack has gained weight almost to obesity, and Stephen is desolated by the death of his dashing, beautiful wife‘but they're still the best of friends, each often knowing what the other is thinking. The prose moves between the maritime sublime and the Austenish bon mot ("a man generally disliked is hardly apt to lavish good food and wine on those who despise him, and Ward's dinners were execrable"). There are some favorite old characters, notably Aubrey's steward, Preserved Killick: "ill-faced, ill-tempered, meagre, atrabilious, shrewish" and thoroughly amusing. Chief among entertaining newcomers is Dr. Amos Jacob, a Cainite Jew ("they derive their descent from the Kenites, who themselves have Abel's brother Cain as their common ancestor"), who comes from a family of jewel merchants and has an encyclopedic grasp of Hebrew, Arabic and Turkish languages (and politics). Jacob is as expert as Stephen at spying and even more of a landlubber. O'Brian continues to unroll a splendid Turkish rug of a saga, and if it seems unlikely that the sedentary Stephen would hunt lions in the Atlas mountains (with the Dey of Algiers!), O'Brian brings off even this narrative feat with aplomb. (Oct.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


Library Journal Review

The Hundred Days refers to the period between Napoleon's departure from Elba and his defeat at Waterloo. O'Brian (Master and Commander), an award-winning, best-selling author of some of the best historical novels ever written, transports us in a time machine to the period when Napoleon tried to reestablish his European Empire by secretly enlisting the forces of Islam. British Commander Jack Aubrey, in a desperate attempt to defeat the French-Muslim menace, sails to Turkey and enlists the ship's doctor, Stephen Maturin, to discern how the enemy can best be vanquished. Although this fascinating work vividly describes Ottoman rulers as well as everyday life in the Islamic capital, this is primarily a tale of gallant sailing ships fighting galleys on storm-tossed seas; of bureaucratic intrigue; and of the civilized pleasures of wining, dining, and stimulating conversation. Narrator Patrick Tull's eloquence captures the humor, the drama, and the atmosphere of the early 19th century. Do not overlook this superb recording.ÄJames Dudley, Westhampton Beach, NY (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Booklist Review

As the latest Aubrey-Maturin adventure opens, Napoleon is reestablishing himself in France, the Allies are mobilizing armies to remove him, newly widowed Stephen Maturin is as good a doctor and as clumsy aloft as ever, and Jack Aubrey is flying a commodore's broad pendant at the head of a motley squadron of frigates and light vessels sent to the Mediterranean. The heroes end up with two missions: prevent the fitting-out of Bonapartist warships in the eastern Mediterranean and intercept a shipment of gold intended to pay Moslem mercenaries to march against Austria and Russia. Employing their own varied skills and the help of a Jewish doctor cum jewel dealer and translator, they survive the perils of the sea, the intrigues of the Arabs, the aggressiveness of hunted lions, and the obtuseness of their own superiors. And, of course, they execute both missions in fine style. O'Brian's is the finest depiction of sailing warfare since C. S. Forester's in the Hornblower tales, and he also brings to life the society of Napoleonic Europe like no one else since Georgette Heyer laid down her writing brush. Not supplying Aubrey-Maturin fandom with this volume would be the equivalent of wantonly stopping the crew's grog, and loud protest, if not outright mutiny, would certainly be the result. --Roland Green


Publisher's Weekly Review

The Aubrey-Maturin series (The Commodore, etc.) nears the two dozen mark the way it began, with colorful historical background, smooth plotting, marvelous characters and great style. The title refers to Napoleon's escape from Elba and brief return to power. Capt. Jack Aubrey must stop a Moorish galley, loaded with gold for Napoleon's mercenaries, from making its delivery. The action takes us into two seas and one ocean and continues nearly nonstop until the climax in the Atlantic. We're quickly reacquainted with the two heroes: handsome sea dog Jack Aubrey, by now a national hero, and Dr. Stephen Maturin, Basque-Irish ship's doctor, naturalist, English spy and hopelessly incompetent seaman. Nothing stays the same, alas: Jack has gained weight almost to obesity, and Stephen is desolated by the death of his dashing, beautiful wife‘but they're still the best of friends, each often knowing what the other is thinking. The prose moves between the maritime sublime and the Austenish bon mot ("a man generally disliked is hardly apt to lavish good food and wine on those who despise him, and Ward's dinners were execrable"). There are some favorite old characters, notably Aubrey's steward, Preserved Killick: "ill-faced, ill-tempered, meagre, atrabilious, shrewish" and thoroughly amusing. Chief among entertaining newcomers is Dr. Amos Jacob, a Cainite Jew ("they derive their descent from the Kenites, who themselves have Abel's brother Cain as their common ancestor"), who comes from a family of jewel merchants and has an encyclopedic grasp of Hebrew, Arabic and Turkish languages (and politics). Jacob is as expert as Stephen at spying and even more of a landlubber. O'Brian continues to unroll a splendid Turkish rug of a saga, and if it seems unlikely that the sedentary Stephen would hunt lions in the Atlas mountains (with the Dey of Algiers!), O'Brian brings off even this narrative feat with aplomb. (Oct.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


Library Journal Review

The Hundred Days refers to the period between Napoleon's departure from Elba and his defeat at Waterloo. O'Brian (Master and Commander), an award-winning, best-selling author of some of the best historical novels ever written, transports us in a time machine to the period when Napoleon tried to reestablish his European Empire by secretly enlisting the forces of Islam. British Commander Jack Aubrey, in a desperate attempt to defeat the French-Muslim menace, sails to Turkey and enlists the ship's doctor, Stephen Maturin, to discern how the enemy can best be vanquished. Although this fascinating work vividly describes Ottoman rulers as well as everyday life in the Islamic capital, this is primarily a tale of gallant sailing ships fighting galleys on storm-tossed seas; of bureaucratic intrigue; and of the civilized pleasures of wining, dining, and stimulating conversation. Narrator Patrick Tull's eloquence captures the humor, the drama, and the atmosphere of the early 19th century. Do not overlook this superb recording.ÄJames Dudley, Westhampton Beach, NY (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


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