Cover image for A child's garden of verses
Title:
A child's garden of verses
Author:
Stevenson, Robert Louis, 1850-1894.
Publication Information:
New York : W. Morrow, [1998]

©1998
Physical Description:
119 pages : color illustrations ; 26 cm.
Summary:
A collection of poems evoking the world and feelings of childhood.
Language:
English
Reading Level:
NP Lexile.
Program Information:
Reading Counts RC 6-8 4.5 3 Quiz: 02119 Guided reading level: NR.
Added Author:
ISBN:
9780688145842
Format :
Book

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PR5489 .C5 1998 Juvenile Non-Fiction Central Closed Stacks
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Summary

Summary

How do you like to go up in a swing, Up in the air so blue? Oh, I do think it the pleasant thing Ever a child can do!

Whether they are remembering soaring into the the sky on a swing or building great palaces of blocks, children will deli ght in these much-loved poems about the everyday joys, truimphs, and small fears of being young.

For over one hundred years, the tender and playful poetry of A Child's Garden of Verses has enchanted readers of all ages. This beautiful new edition--with over seventy full-color and black-and-white images from award-winning artist Diane Goode --is the perfectway for parents and children to explore together the warmth and humor of the first years.

Glowing with the fantasy of childhood dreams and the clarity of childhood perceptions, this celebration of the wonders of childhood is sure to be welcomed by all.

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Author Notes

Novelist, poet, and essayist Robert Louis Stevenson was born in Edinburgh, Scotland. A sickly child, Stevenson was an invalid for part of his childhood and remained in ill health throughout his life. He began studying engineering at Edinburgh University but soon switched to law. His true inclination, however, was for writing. For several years after completing his studies, Stevenson traveled on the Continent, gathering ideas for his writing. His Inland Voyage (1878) and Travels with a Donkey (1878) describe some of his experiences there. A variety of essays and short stories followed, most of which were published in magazines. It was with the publication of Treasure Island in 1883, however, that Stevenson achieved wide recognition and fame. This was followed by his most successful adventure story, Kidnapped, which appeared in 1886.

With stories such as Treasure Island and Kidnapped, Stevenson revived Daniel Defoe's novel of romantic adventure, adding to it psychological analysis. While these stories and others, such as David Balfour and The Master of Ballantrae (1889), are stories of adventure, they are at the same time fine studies of character. The Master of Ballantrae, in particular, is a study of evil character, and this study is taken even further in The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde (1886).

In 1887 Stevenson and his wife, Fanny, went to the United States, first to the health spas of Saranac Lake, New York, and then on to the West Coast. From there they set out for the South Seas in 1889. Except for one trip to Sidney, Australia, Stevenson spent the remainder of his life on the island of Samoa with his devoted wife and stepson. While there he wrote The Wrecker (1892), Island Nights Entertainments (1893), and Catriona (1893), a sequel to Kidnapped. He also worked on St. Ives and The Weir of Hermiston, which many consider to be his masterpiece. He died suddenly of apoplexy, leaving both of these works unfinished. Both were published posthumously; St. Ives was completed by Sir Arthur Quiller-Couch, and The Weir of Hermiston was published unfinished. Stevenson was buried on Samoa, an island he had come to love very much.

Although Stevenson's novels are perhaps more accomplished, his short stories are also vivid and memorable. All show his power of invention, his command of the macabre and the eerie, and the psychological depth of his characterization.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 3

Booklist Review

Ages 4-9. The poems are oh-so familiar and the artwork extends the nostalgia; yet Cooper Edens' conception, choice of illustration, and the juxtaposition of the art and text on the page bring a new appreciation of both words and pictures. More than 100 selections from illustrators from the nineteenth and early-twentieth centuries grace the crisp white pages in a pleasing mix of full color and black and white. The works, mostly taken from previously illustrated editions of Stevenson's famous collection, are by such well-known artists as Jessie Wilcox Smith, Charles Robinson, H. Willebeek Le Mair, Margaret Tarrant, and Willy Pogany. Sources and a short biography of the poet are appended. M. Dibdin Spooner's painting for "The Land of Counterpane" appears on the dust jacket, making an enticing invitation to enter Stevenson's rich and magical world; those who respond will cherish the experience. --Barbara Elleman


Publisher's Weekly Review

A plethora of poetry books arrive just in time for National Poetry Month. Now available in a board book edition, A Child's Garden of Verses, compiled by Cooper Edens, pairs eight of Robert Louis Stevenson's poems with turn-of-the-century illustrations to captivate a child's imagination. For instance, "Happy Thought" ("The world is so full of a number of things,/ I'm sure we should all be as happy as kings") is embedded like a placard within a pen-and-ink by E. Mars (1900), while opposite, a 1940 illustration by Ruth Mary Hallock depicts a happy assembly of children and kittens, gathering for a snack break after a game of croquet. (Mar.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


School Library Journal Review

PreS Up-- This new presentation of Stevenson's classic childhood poems brings together an unusual combination of artistic technique but falls short of any notable new interpretation. The pages are reproductions of needlework borders done by Sara Gutierrez; they lend a colorful, quaint look that complements Lewis' paintings of old-fashioned children. Each poem is laid out on a page, and the artists have nicely varied placement of painting and border. Some of the scenes are imaginative, as in ``Young Night Thought,'' which shows a girl carried by two genies. Others, however, are dull, such as the boy and girl in ``Good and Bad Children''; here, the girl stands with hands behind her back looking prim while the boy sticks his tongue out at her. No attempt at universality has been made in this new edition: boys outnumber girls, and all of the children are white except one. For a classic look, editions by Tasha Tudor and Jessie W. Smith still remain the top choices. --Marianne Pilla, Upper Dublin Public Library, Dresher, PA (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.