Cover image for Masterworks of Asian art
Title:
Masterworks of Asian art
Author:
Cleveland Museum of Art.
Corporate Author:
Publication Information:
Cleveland : Cleveland Museum of Art ; New York : Thames and Hudson, 1998.
Physical Description:
254 pages : illustrations (chiefly color) ; 31 cm
General Note:
Collection housed in the Cleveland Museum of Art.
Language:
English
Added Author:
ISBN:
9780940717435

9780940717428

9780500974667
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Central Library N7262 .C59 1998 Adult Non-Fiction Central Closed Stacks-Oversize
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Summary

Summary

From the time of Marco Polo's journeys and the legendary Silk Road, the ancient cultures of Asia have fascinated and enriched the West. Now, at the end of the twentieth century, interest in Asian art and thought has never been more intense.


Summary

From the time of Marco Polo's journeys and the legendary Silk Road, the ancient cultures of Asia have fascinated and enriched the West. Now, at the end of the twentieth century, interest in Asian art and thought has never been more intense.


Summary

This volume displays the highlights of the Cleveland Museum of Art's collection of Asian art, begun in 1913 when the museum was founded. It presents more than 100 of the finest objects including Chinese paintings and textiles, traditional Japanese ink paintings and medieval stoneware, and examples of Cambodian and early Indian stone sculpture. The Cleveland's treasures include: an extraordinary lacquered drum stand of China's Eastern Zhou dynasty; the Kumano Mandala; and Snowscape with Figures, the only dated painting by Kim Che, the foremost artist from the Choson period in Korea. Michael Cunningham's introduction recounts the history of the collection's formation, and the commentaries reflect scholarship in the field.


Reviews 6

Library Journal Review

This book showcases the finest works of Asian art in the permanent collections of the Cleveland Museum of Art, one of America's leading collectors of this category. Selected from 4,399 holdings in a variety of media, more than 100 pieces are highlighted in full-page color reproductions, all accompanied by one-page commentaries by current or former curators. The introductory essay recounts the vision and historic formation of the collections, established in 1913. Covering arts from not only traditionally well-represented countries such as China, Japan, India, and Korea but also from lesser-known ones like Thailand, Cambodia, Vietnam, Nepal, Kashmir, and Tibet, this book encapsulates centuries of ritual, belief, legend, and cultural archetype, culminating in the self-definition of the Asian peoples. Intended for both general readers and scholars, this is recommended as an important addition to the Asian art collections of public and academic libraries.‘Lucia S. Chen, NYPL (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Choice Review

More than 100 masterpieces chosen from the Cleveland Museum's distinguished collection of Asian art are displayed in this catalog. The selection of the art works, including ceramics, lacquer, and textiles, has been carefully balanced between China, Central Asia, Japan, Korea, India, and Southeast Asia. After an introductory chapter relating the history of the collection, each entry is presented in full-page color, facing short commentaries explaining its historical and artistic importance. Written by four scholars, all present or former curators of the Cleveland Museum, the text is well written and informative, but the art works are not examined in depth and there is little comparative or reference material, not even a list of illustrations or an index. Still, most of the art works are already familiar to students through publication in such works as the popular A History of Far Eastern Art (5th ed., 1994), by the museum's former director, Sherman E. Lee. Other recent sources are mentioned in the bibliography. Not indispensable for the college library, but the fine large illustrations would appeal to undergraduates of all levels as well as to general readers. M. Morehart; emeritus, University of British Columbia


Library Journal Review

This book showcases the finest works of Asian art in the permanent collections of the Cleveland Museum of Art, one of America's leading collectors of this category. Selected from 4,399 holdings in a variety of media, more than 100 pieces are highlighted in full-page color reproductions, all accompanied by one-page commentaries by current or former curators. The introductory essay recounts the vision and historic formation of the collections, established in 1913. Covering arts from not only traditionally well-represented countries such as China, Japan, India, and Korea but also from lesser-known ones like Thailand, Cambodia, Vietnam, Nepal, Kashmir, and Tibet, this book encapsulates centuries of ritual, belief, legend, and cultural archetype, culminating in the self-definition of the Asian peoples. Intended for both general readers and scholars, this is recommended as an important addition to the Asian art collections of public and academic libraries.‘Lucia S. Chen, NYPL (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Choice Review

More than 100 masterpieces chosen from the Cleveland Museum's distinguished collection of Asian art are displayed in this catalog. The selection of the art works, including ceramics, lacquer, and textiles, has been carefully balanced between China, Central Asia, Japan, Korea, India, and Southeast Asia. After an introductory chapter relating the history of the collection, each entry is presented in full-page color, facing short commentaries explaining its historical and artistic importance. Written by four scholars, all present or former curators of the Cleveland Museum, the text is well written and informative, but the art works are not examined in depth and there is little comparative or reference material, not even a list of illustrations or an index. Still, most of the art works are already familiar to students through publication in such works as the popular A History of Far Eastern Art (5th ed., 1994), by the museum's former director, Sherman E. Lee. Other recent sources are mentioned in the bibliography. Not indispensable for the college library, but the fine large illustrations would appeal to undergraduates of all levels as well as to general readers. M. Morehart; emeritus, University of British Columbia


Library Journal Review

This book showcases the finest works of Asian art in the permanent collections of the Cleveland Museum of Art, one of America's leading collectors of this category. Selected from 4,399 holdings in a variety of media, more than 100 pieces are highlighted in full-page color reproductions, all accompanied by one-page commentaries by current or former curators. The introductory essay recounts the vision and historic formation of the collections, established in 1913. Covering arts from not only traditionally well-represented countries such as China, Japan, India, and Korea but also from lesser-known ones like Thailand, Cambodia, Vietnam, Nepal, Kashmir, and Tibet, this book encapsulates centuries of ritual, belief, legend, and cultural archetype, culminating in the self-definition of the Asian peoples. Intended for both general readers and scholars, this is recommended as an important addition to the Asian art collections of public and academic libraries.‘Lucia S. Chen, NYPL (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Choice Review

More than 100 masterpieces chosen from the Cleveland Museum's distinguished collection of Asian art are displayed in this catalog. The selection of the art works, including ceramics, lacquer, and textiles, has been carefully balanced between China, Central Asia, Japan, Korea, India, and Southeast Asia. After an introductory chapter relating the history of the collection, each entry is presented in full-page color, facing short commentaries explaining its historical and artistic importance. Written by four scholars, all present or former curators of the Cleveland Museum, the text is well written and informative, but the art works are not examined in depth and there is little comparative or reference material, not even a list of illustrations or an index. Still, most of the art works are already familiar to students through publication in such works as the popular A History of Far Eastern Art (5th ed., 1994), by the museum's former director, Sherman E. Lee. Other recent sources are mentioned in the bibliography. Not indispensable for the college library, but the fine large illustrations would appeal to undergraduates of all levels as well as to general readers. M. Morehart; emeritus, University of British Columbia


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