Cover image for Daisy knows best
Title:
Daisy knows best
Author:
Kopper, Lisa.
Personal Author:
Edition:
First American edition.
Publication Information:
New York : Dutton Children's Books, 1999.
Physical Description:
26 unnumbered pages : color illustrations 26 cm
Summary:
When Baby tags along with Daisy and her puppies, everyone ends up needing a bath.
Language:
English
Program Information:
Accelerated Reader AR LG 1.6 0.5 48095.
ISBN:
9780525459156
Format :
Book

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Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Central Library PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Childrens Area-Picture Books
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Eggertsville-Snyder Library PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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Hamburg Library PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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Summary

Summary

This is the third picture-book story about the escapades of bullterrier Daisy, now a mom with three darling pups. Toddlers will delight in the naughty lessons Daisy teaches her pups -- and the family's human baby, who joins in with the other little ones.

Daisy knows best how to open the mail (by shredding it), how to tend the garden (by digging deep holes), and how to fold the laundry (by spreading it all over the backyard). But the human mommy is the one who really knows best what to do with the messy crew -- she teaches them all a big lesson in the bathtub!


Author Notes

Lisa Kopper lives in England.


Reviews 3

Booklist Review

Ages 3^-5. It's definitely hard to resist sweet Daisy dog, whose appearance in Daisy Thinks She Is a Baby (1994) was a total delight. It's even harder to resist Daisy's three rambunctious puppies, who play central roles in this new Daisy adventure. This time, Daisy isn't trying to be anything but a mom. However, in teaching her pups, she also teaches the resident baby of the house. The ensuing havoc, which Kopper depicts in delicate nursery colors, is wonderful, whether it's Daisy "setting" the table with pup and Baby by her side; Daisy "folding" laundry to the consternation of Baby's mom; or Daisy teaching her pups and precocious Baby precisely what to do with the newspaper that is spread out on the floor. Characters, both canine and human, are full of personality, and Kopper has taken care to preserve both the spirit and humor of Daisy's earlier adventures. A real charmer. --Stephanie Zvirin


Publisher's Weekly Review

In this irresistible picture book, just a few words per page describe Daisy, a charming pooch who's a perfect role model for her three pudgy puppies and the chubby human baby who shares a home with them. The text on each spread is a study in subtlety. "Daisy teaches Delores how to set the table./ Baby learns, too" reads the caption for a depiction of the mother dog pulling down a laden tablecloth on the left, while the right side shows Baby wreaking havoc on a place setting. Baby even gleefully mimics Daisy's example of relieving herself on a sheet of newspaper. But when Daisy teaches her canine and human charges how to "fold the laundry" by strewing it around the backyard, Mommy steps in to provide her own style of pedagogy: "Now everyone learns to have a bath.../ because mommies know best of all." Kopper's (Daisy Is a Mommy) neatly framed illustrations are as winning and economical as her text. Daisy, with her long snout, tiny soulful eyes and squooshy postnatal body, is the epitome of doggy maternal love and duty. And the puppies and Baby's physical resemblance to each other is wonderfully comic. Ages 2-4. (Feb.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


School Library Journal Review

PreS-Gr 1-The star of Daisy Thinks She's a Baby (Knopf, 1994) and Daisy Is a Mommy (Viking, 1997) is back. In this new adventure, the bullterrier instructs her three puppies and the baby of the house in a multitude of tasks from opening the mail and setting the table to digging in the garden and cleaning up the garbage. Preschoolers will laugh at the lessons Daisy teaches the youngsters and their often messy results. The story reads aloud well, and the text is simple and repetitive enough for beginning readers. The soft, pencil illustrations reflect the lively humor and chaotic events described in the narrative. Daisy's many fans will be happy to see her back in action.-Maura Bresnahan, Shawsheen School, Andover, MA (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


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