Cover image for Desegregation in Boston and Buffalo : the influence of local leaders
Title:
Desegregation in Boston and Buffalo : the influence of local leaders
Author:
Taylor, Steven J. L., 1958-
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
Albany, N.Y. : State University of New York Press, [1998]

©1998
Physical Description:
xiii, 259 pages : illustrations, maps ; 24 cm.
Language:
English
ISBN:
9780791439197
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Central Library LC214.23.B67 T396 1998 Adult Non-Fiction Grosvenor Room-Buffalo Closed Stacks
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Central Library LC214.23.B67 T396 1998 Adult Non-Fiction Non-Fiction Area
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Central Library LC214.23.B67 T396 1998 Adult Non-Fiction Central Closed Stacks
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Central Library LC214.23.B67 T396 1998 Adult Non-Fiction Grosvenor Room-Buffalo Collection Non-Circ
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Summary

Summary

Examines how citizens and the political leadership of two cities dealt with controversial court orders to end the segregation of public schools.


Author Notes

Steven J. L. Taylor is Visiting Assistant Professor of Government at American University.


Reviews 1

Choice Review

From 1993 until 1995, Steven Taylor interviewed 30 local leaders in Boston, Massachusetts, and 35 in Buffalo, New York, related to school desegregation. Several Boston leaders chose not to cooperate with the courts; violence erupted. Although white New York residents saw desegregation as inappropriate, the superintendent of schools used the order to create jobs for people who opposed the decision, and they abandoned their opposition. Taylor's conclusions reinforce the 1976 report of the US Civil Rights Commission, Fulfilling the Letter and Spirit of the Law: "The process of school desegregation is significantly affected by the support or the opposition that it receives from the local community's leadership." While local leaders can influence a desegregation plan, their control is limited. Once people form an opinion and take action, the leaders cannot change it. Readers interested in the ways that Boston's black community leaders participate in politics may consult Ralph Edwards and Charles Willie, Black Power/White Power in Public Education (CH, Jan'99). Descriptions of local leaders' influence in Ohio can be found in Gregory Jacobs, Getting around Brown (CH, Sep'98) and Joseph Watras, Politics, Race, and Schools (1997). Graduate students and faculty; professionals; general readers in academic and public libraries. J. Watras; University of Dayton


Table of Contents

List of Tablesp. ix
List of Figuresp. xi
Acknowledgmentsp. xiii
Chapter 1 Introductionp. 1
Chapter 2 Inter-ethnic Struggles in Boston and Buffalop. 13
Chapter 3 The Politics of School Segregationp. 41
Chapter 4 The Responses of the Local Community Leadershipp. 67
Chapter 5 Community Reactions to the Implementation of Busingp. 135
Chapter 6 Informants' Explanations of the Community Reactionsp. 167
Chapter 7 Conclusionsp. 199
Notesp. 221
Bibliographyp. 237
Indexp. 251

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