Cover image for Report from Engine Co. 82.
Report from Engine Co. 82.
Smith, Dennis, 1940-
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
New York : Saturday Review Press [1972]
Physical Description:
215 pages ; 22 cm
General Note:
Local Note:
Editions may vary.
Format :


Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Central Library TH9505.N5 S63 Adult Non-Fiction Central Closed Stacks
Central Library TH9505.N5 S63 Adult Non-Fiction Central Closed Stacks
Kenmore Library TH9505.N5 S63 Adult Non-Fiction Open Shelf

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This could be the night reads the sign above the firehouse door. And, indeed, with the introspection of a man prepared to face death with every alarm bell, Dennis Smith turns his observant eye upon the lives he unflinchingly places before his own. From his bawdy and brave fellow firefighters to the hopeful, hateful, beautiful and beleaguered residents of the poverty-stricken district where he works, this is the compelling human story of the most brutalizing -- and most rewarding -- profession in the country.

Author Notes

Dennis Smith spent 18 years with the New York City Fire Department. Smith lives in New York City.

Reviews 1

Library Journal Review

In 1972, Emergency, a show about the Los Angeles Fire Department, debuted on network TV. That same year, Smith, a New York City fireman, published this book about life in what was the busiest fire station in the country. It is the diary of a fireman in a station with over 700 calls per month. From the life and death heroics of firefighting to the frustration of false alarms and garbage fires, Smith ably shares his life at Engine Co. 82. Written during a period of civil unrest, the work captures the spirit of that time and shows how the social problems of the era affected the lives of the firemen whose duty was to protect all the citizens in their district. The author paints a portrait of the fire house: the drills, the off-color jokes, the male-bonding that occurs when men know their lives will often be in the hands of their buddies. Adam Henderson does a great job with the various New York City accents. Highly recommended for all public libraries.-Theresa Connors, Arkansas Tech Univ., Russellville (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

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