Cover image for What is the world made of? : all about solids, liquids, and gases
Title:
What is the world made of? : all about solids, liquids, and gases
Author:
Zoehfeld, Kathleen Weidner.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
New York : HarperCollins Publishers, 1998.
Physical Description:
32 pages : color illustrations ; 20 x 25 cm.
Summary:
In simple text, presents the three states of matter, solid, liquid, and gas, and describes their attributes.
Language:
English
Reading Level:
560 Lexile.
Program Information:
Accelerated Reader AR LG 3.7 0.5 41750.

Reading Counts RC K-2 2.8 2 Quiz: 13211 Guided reading level: K.
Added Author:
ISBN:
9780060271435

9780060271442

9780064451635
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Clearfield Library QC173.16 .Z64 1998 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Crane Branch Library QC173.16 .Z64 1998 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Eggertsville-Snyder Library QC173.16 .Z64 1998 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Grand Island Library QC173.16 .Z64 1998 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Hamburg Library QC173.16 .Z64 1998 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Lancaster Library QC173.16 .Z64 1998 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Marilla Free Library QC173.16 .Z64 1998 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Niagara Branch Library QC173.16 .Z64 1998 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Williamsville Library QC173.16 .Z64 1998 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Julia Boyer Reinstein Library QC173.16 .Z64 1998 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Audubon Library QC173.16 .Z64 1998 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Eden Library QC173.16 .Z64 1998 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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On Order

Summary

Summary

Did you ever walk through a wall? Drink a glass of blocks? Have you ever played with a lemonade doll, or put on milk for socks? This latest addition to the Let's-Read-and-Find-Out Science series introduces the youngest readers to an important science concept: the differences between solids, liquids, and gases. Any child who wants to know why he can't walk through a wall will enjoy Kathleen Zoehfeld's simple text and Paul Meisel's playful illustrations.


Author Notes

Kathleen Zoehfeld is a writer and editor of nonfiction children's books. She grew up in the Catskill Mountains, where she developed a passion for observing, reading and writing about nature.

Zoehfeld is a former children's book editor and an award-winning author of many books for young people on natural history and scientific topics.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 2

Booklist Review

Gr. 1^-2. Once again the Let's-Read-and-Find-Out-about Science series takes on a really difficult concept and dramatizes it with hands-on examples from everyday life. This time, the concept is the three states of matter: solid, liquid, and gas. The explanations are clear with a simple, informal text for the new reader, and the lively line-and-watercolor pictures bring in humor and commonsense ("Did you ever drink a glass of blocks?"). Water is the central example of how some things change from solid to liquid to gas, but words and pictures show that most things in the child's world stay in one state or another ("And it's a good thing they do! Can you imagine a world where . . . ?") A final page includes simple activities to do to find out more. --Hazel Rochman YA Talk Feasting on the Language of Life--Adult Poetry for Young Adults


School Library Journal Review

Gr 1-3-A fact-filled, accessible study of solids, liquids, and gases. The book gives examples of each state of matter and some simple activities that demonstrate the attributes of each. The last page presents three related science experiments. The author's use of sentence fragments, such as "Water flowing in the creek," is bothersome, but the humorous illustrations add to the text and provide a good mix of children of both genders and various races enjoying science. The page layout makes this title suitable for use with groups; the easy-to-read text makes it a good choice for independent reading and research. Teachers will delight in the clear definitions and examples used to introduce concepts that are often offered on a much higher level.-Marty Abbott Goodman, L. J. Bell Elementary School, Rockingham, NC (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


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