Cover image for Monsters in the closet : homosexuality and the horror film
Title:
Monsters in the closet : homosexuality and the horror film
Author:
Benshoff, Harry M., 1963-
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
Manchester : Manchester University Press, 1997.
Physical Description:
viii, 328 pages : illustrations ; 22 cm.
General Note:
Includes index.
Language:
English
ISBN:
9780719044724

9780719044731
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Central Library PN1995.9.H55 B457 1997 Adult Non-Fiction Non-Fiction Area
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Central Library PN1995.9.H55 B457 1997 Adult Non-Fiction Central Closed Stacks-Non circulating
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Summary

Summary

Monster in the closet is a history of the horrors film that explores the genre's relationship to the social and cultural history of homosexuality in America.


Summary

One of the few books to address the horror film from any kind of critical position. Unique - The first history of the horror film to approach it from a queer perspective. Written with detail and thoroughness - covers all eras of the horror film and correlates specific types of movie monstersto the historical social conditions which produced them. Explores how popular culture encodes and demonizes queerness within the generic format of the horror film.


Author Notes

Harry M. Benshoff recently received his doctorate from the University of Southern California's School of Cinema-Television. He teaches film and television classes in and around Los Angeles.


Reviews 2

Library Journal Review

Arguing from a postmodern perspective, Benshoff, who teaches film and TV in the Los Angeles area, examines how Hollywood has historically "monsterized" homosexuality even as gay and lesbian viewers were learning to read queer elements into classic horror films. The author traces the concept of monster queer as it evolved from one era to the next. Although Benshoff's erudition creates some weighty prose, his refreshing readings of works by gay and gay-associated directors (e.g., James Whale, Clive Barker) and performers (e.g., Charles Laughton, Bela Lugosi) is worth the trouble. An interesting theoretical companion to earlier monographs that touch on gays and horror films, including Vito Russo's seminal Celluloid Closet (1987. rev. ed.), Andrea Weiss's Vampires and Violets (Penguin, 1993), and Rhona Berenstein's Attack of the Leading Ladies (Columbia Univ., 1996); recommended for both queer and film studies collections.‘Anthony J. Adam, Prairie View A&M Univ. Lib., Houston (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Library Journal Review

Arguing from a postmodern perspective, Benshoff, who teaches film and TV in the Los Angeles area, examines how Hollywood has historically "monsterized" homosexuality even as gay and lesbian viewers were learning to read queer elements into classic horror films. The author traces the concept of monster queer as it evolved from one era to the next. Although Benshoff's erudition creates some weighty prose, his refreshing readings of works by gay and gay-associated directors (e.g., James Whale, Clive Barker) and performers (e.g., Charles Laughton, Bela Lugosi) is worth the trouble. An interesting theoretical companion to earlier monographs that touch on gays and horror films, including Vito Russo's seminal Celluloid Closet (1987. rev. ed.), Andrea Weiss's Vampires and Violets (Penguin, 1993), and Rhona Berenstein's Attack of the Leading Ladies (Columbia Univ., 1996); recommended for both queer and film studies collections.‘Anthony J. Adam, Prairie View A&M Univ. Lib., Houston (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


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