Cover image for The Egypt game
Title:
The Egypt game
Author:
Snyder, Zilpha Keatley.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
New York : Atheneum, [1976]

©1976
Physical Description:
215 pages : illustrations ; 22 cm
Summary:
A group of children, entranced with the study of Egypt, play their own Egypt game, are visited by a secret oracle, become involved in a murder, and befriend the Professor before they move on to new interests, such as Gypsies.
Language:
English
Reading Level:
1010 Lexile.
Program Information:
Accelerated Reader AR MG 6.4 7.0 217.

Reading Counts RC 6-8 5.9 12 Quiz: 03476 Guided reading level: X.
ISBN:
9780689300066
Format :
Book

Available:*

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Central Library X Juvenile Fiction Central Closed Stacks
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Crane Branch Library X Juvenile Fiction Open Shelf
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On Order

Summary

Summary

A group of children, entranced with the study of Egypt, play their own Egypt game, are visited by a secret oracle, become involved in a murder, and befriend the Professor before they move on to new interests, such as Gypsies.


Author Notes

Zilpha Keatley Snyder was born in Lemoore, California on May 11, 1927. She received a B.A. from Whittier College in 1948. While ultimately planning to be a writer, after graduation she decided to teach school temporarily. However, she found teaching to be an extremely rewarding experience and taught in the upper elementary grades for a total of nine years. After all of her children were in school, she began to think of writing again.

Her first book, Season of Ponies, was published in 1964. She wrote more than 40 books during her lifetime including The Trespassers, Gib Rides Home, Gib and the Gray Ghost, and William's Midsummer Dreams. She has won numerous awards including three Newbery Honor books for The Egypt Game, The Headless Cupid and The Witches of Worm and the 1995 John and Patricia Beatty Award for Cat Running. She died of complications from a stroke on October 08, 2014 at the age of 87.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 2

Booklist Review

Tension runs high as six city children play a game based on ancient Egyptian rituals and are unaware that they are being watched.


Publisher's Weekly Review

Two girls get involved in an elaborate ``Egypt game,'' a fantasy game that soon leads to strange, unexplainable happenings. PW called the characters in Snyder's Newbery Honor winner ``true originals.'' (8-12) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


Excerpts

Excerpts

An Excerpt from The Egypt Game             All through the month of August, Melanie and April were together almost             every day. They played the paper-families game and other games, both             in the Rosses' apartment and in Caroline's. They took Marshall for             walks and to the park while Mrs. Ross was gone to her class, and almost             every day they went to the library. It was in the library in August             that the seeds were planted that grew into the Egypt Game in September             in the Professor's deserted yard.             It all started when April found a new book about Egypt, an especially             interesting one about the life of a young pharaoh. She passed it on             to Melanie, and with it a lot of interest in all sorts of ancient             stuff. Melanie was soon as fascinated by the valley of the Nile as             April had been. Before long, with the help of a sympathetic librarian,             they had found and read just about everything the library had to offer             on Egypt--both fact and fiction.             They read about Egypt in the library during the day, and at home in             the evening, and in bed late at night when they were supposed to be             asleep. Then in the mornings while they helped each other with their             chores they discussed the things they had found out. In a very short             time they had accumulated all sorts of fascinating facts about tombs             and temples, pharaohs and pyramids, mummies and monoliths, and dozens             of other exotic topics. They decided that the Egyptians couldn't have             been more interesting if they had done it on purpose. Everything,             from their love of beauty and mystery, to their fascinating habit             of getting married when they were only eleven years old, made good             stuff to talk about. By the end of the month, April and Melanie were             beginning work on their own alphabet of hieroglyphics for writing             secret messages, and at the library they were beginning to be called             the Egypt Girls.              Excerpted from The Egypt Game by Zilpha Keatley Snyder All rights reserved by the original copyright owners. Excerpts are provided for display purposes only and may not be reproduced, reprinted or distributed without the written permission of the publisher.

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