Cover image for Living with the Adirondack forest : local perspectives on land use conflicts
Title:
Living with the Adirondack forest : local perspectives on land use conflicts
Author:
Knott, Catherine Henshaw.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
Ithaca : Cornell University Press, 1998.
Physical Description:
xix, 314 pages : illustrations, map ; 24 cm
Language:
English
ISBN:
9780801431227

9780801485008
Format :
Book

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Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Central Library SD428.A2 N75 1998 Adult Non-Fiction Central Closed Stacks
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Summary

Summary

The author of this study suggests that attitudes toward land-use may reflect profound differences in class, religion and life experience, pitting urban Americans who see nature at risk against rural Americans whose lives are dominated by nature's forces.


Summary

"While locals are inherently integral to land use decisions, their story is seldom coherently placed within the context of competing interests. Knott effectively places local perspectives in the Adirondack land use conflict to illustrate the need for participatory approaches to decision-making."--Valerie A. Luzadis, SUNY College of Environmental Science and ForestryAttitudes about land use, Catherine Henshaw Knott suggests, may reflect profound differences in class, religion, and life experience, pitting urban Americans who see nature at risk against rural Americans whose lives are dominated by nature's forces. She documents the thoughts and feelings of people whose lives are intimately connected to the forest, including loggers, trappers, craftspeople, and guides, as well as tree farmers and maple syrup producers. After describing the key players in the conflict and chronicling battles and bridge-building between stake-holders, Knott concludes that the participation of local people in decision making is the only process that can shift an increasingly hostile cycle toward resolution.


Reviews 1

Choice Review

Knott's excellent overview of the issues and perspectives of management and uses of the Adirondack forest draws upon this forest to frame the wider land-use debate taking place across the nation, especially in the Northwest. She explores the conflict that exists wherever logging occurs and the inevitable changing land use patterns that result. She contends that the land-use conflict dialog arises from four differing points of view, depending on the beliefs and experiences of the people involved; these viewpoints are dominated by aesthetics, ecology, land zoning, and local conditions. This anthropological study uses traditional field methods with some unique scientific terminology, but not excessively. Knott conducted some 150 formal interviews as an outside observer; she addresses the question of the human relationship to the ecosystem by exploring and defining the range of attitudes and philosophies held by residents and visitors to the forest, and the contrast between these two general groups. She succeeds at clearly describing the distinction between communities of place and communities of interest and land use, from strict preservation of the forest to its exploitation. This book also contributes to the emerging concepts within ecosystem management, using the critical lessons learned in the Adirondack forest as an example. Excellent bibliography; good illustrations; thorough index. General readers; upper-division undergraduates through professionals. D. L. Richter; Michigan Technological University


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