Cover image for Laurel & Hardy : from the forties forward
Title:
Laurel & Hardy : from the forties forward
Author:
MacGillivray, Scott, 1957-
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
Lanham : Vestal Press, [1998]

©1998
Physical Description:
xv, 223 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm
General Note:
Includes index.
Language:
English
ISBN:
9781879511354

9781879511415
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Central Library PN2287.L285 M24 1998 Adult Non-Fiction Non-Fiction Area
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Summary

Summary

A ground-breaking look at a famed comedy team's films during the war years. Even to dedicated fans, Laurel and Hardy's wartime movies remain relatively unknown, despite their first-run success. Here, painstaking research, coupled with great photographs and movie stills, convincingly demonstrates that these films are worthy of study and appreciation. 80 photos.


Summary

A ground-breaking look at the duo's films during and after the war years!


Reviews 2

Library Journal Review

MacGillivray, a film writer and longtime fan of Laurel and Hardy, focuses on the famous duo's later celluloid contributions, painting them as Hollywood casualties. According to MacGillivray, Laurel and Hardy were unwitting victims of the studio era's demise and the desperate attempts by producers to gain artistic control, hedge bets, and cash in on past successes. Occupying the margins of A- and B-picture status, they became incidental, has-been characters in search of a suitable vehicle for their talents. A fair portion of this slim volume routinely recaps film plots, but reactions from contemporaneous exhibitors contrast well with comments from critics, pointing up the contradictions inherent in popular culture. Uneven but still recommended for film collections.‘Jayne Plymale, Stamford, CT (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Library Journal Review

MacGillivray, a film writer and longtime fan of Laurel and Hardy, focuses on the famous duo's later celluloid contributions, painting them as Hollywood casualties. According to MacGillivray, Laurel and Hardy were unwitting victims of the studio era's demise and the desperate attempts by producers to gain artistic control, hedge bets, and cash in on past successes. Occupying the margins of A- and B-picture status, they became incidental, has-been characters in search of a suitable vehicle for their talents. A fair portion of this slim volume routinely recaps film plots, but reactions from contemporaneous exhibitors contrast well with comments from critics, pointing up the contradictions inherent in popular culture. Uneven but still recommended for film collections.‘Jayne Plymale, Stamford, CT (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


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