Cover image for An education in Georgia : Charlayne Hunter, Hamilton Holmes, and the integration of the University of Georgia
Title:
An education in Georgia : Charlayne Hunter, Hamilton Holmes, and the integration of the University of Georgia
Author:
Trillin, Calvin.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
Athens : Brown Thrasher Books : University of Georgia Press, 1991.
Physical Description:
xiv, 180 pages ; 21 cm
General Note:
Reprint with new introd. Originally published: New York : Viking, 1964.
Language:
English
ISBN:
9780820313887
Format :
Book

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Status
Central Library LD1986 .T75 1991 Adult Non-Fiction Central Closed Stacks
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Summary

Summary

In January 1961, following eighteen months of litigation that culminated in a federal court order, Hamilton Holmes and Charlayne Hunter became the first black students to enter the University of Georgia. Calvin Trillin, then a reporter for Time Magazine , attended the court fight that led to the admission of Holmes and Hunter and covered their first week at the university-a week that began in relative calm, moved on to a riot and the suspension of the two students "for their own safety," and ended with both returning to the campus under a new court order.

Shortly before their graduation in 1963, Trillin came back to Georgia to determine what their college lives had been like. He interviewed not only Holmes and Hunter but also their families, friends, and fellow students, professors, and university administrators. The result was this book-a sharply detailed portrait of how these two young people faced coldness, hostility, and occasional understanding on a southern campus in the midst of a great social change.


Author Notes

Calvin Trillin attended public schools in Kansas City and went on to Yale University and graduated in 1957; he later served as a Fellow of the University. He was born on December 5, 1935. He worked as a reporter for Time magazine before joining the staff of The New Yorker in 1963. His reporting for The New Yorker on the racial integration of the University of Georgia was published in his first book, An Education in Georgia. Family, travel and food are also themes in Trillin's work. Three of his books American Fried; Alice, Let's Eat; and Third Helpings; were individually published and are also collected in the 1994 compendium The Tummy Trilogy. He has also written a collection of short stories Barnett Frummer Is An Unbloomed Flower (1969) and three comic novels, Runestruck (1977), Floater (1980), and Tepper Isn't Going Out (2001). Among his recent work, is Dogfight: The 2012 Presidential Campaign in Verse. He was awarded the Thurber Prize for American Humor for Quite Enough of Calvin Trillin: Forty Years of Funny Stuff, in 2012.

(Bowker Author Biography)


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