Cover image for The peacock's pride
Title:
The peacock's pride
Author:
Kajpust, Melissa.
Personal Author:
Edition:
First edition.
Publication Information:
New York : Hyperion Books for Children, 1997.
Physical Description:
1 volume (unpaged) : color illustrations ; 29 cm
Summary:
A retelling of a traditional tale from northern India in which a conceited peacock learns that beauty has many forms.
Language:
English
Added Author:
ISBN:
9780786802937

9780786822331
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Central Library PZ8.1.K1275 PE 1997 Juvenile Non-Fiction Central Closed Stacks
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Summary

Summary

High up in the sheltering boughs of a Banyan tree, a group of thirsty birds watches over an inviting pool of water. None of the birds dares to drink from it, however, for fear of inciting the wrath of Old Viper, a vicious snake. Beautiful Peacock wagers that if he can manage to rid them of the reptile, he will then be deemed "king" of the watering hole. Highly skeptical of his success, the other birds readily agree. When Peacock wins the wager, however, the birds find themselves in the hands of an even worse oppressor than Old Viper. Help comes in the form of the unlikeliest of sources when Koel, the plainest bird among them, hatches a plan to teach Peacock a lesson in humility that will have his feathers trailing behind him for the rest of his days.


Summary

High up in the sheltering boughs of a Banyan tree, a group of thirsty birds watches over an inviting pool of water. None of the birds dares to drink from it, however, for fear of inciting the wrath of Old Viper, a vicious snake. Beautiful Peacock wagers that if he can manage to rid them of the reptile, he will then be deemed "king" of the watering hole. Highly skeptical of his success, the other birds readily agree. When Peacock wins the wager, however, the birds find themselves in the hands of an even worse oppressor than Old Viper. Help comes in the form of the unlikeliest of sources when Koel, the plainest bird among them, hatches a plan to teach Peacock a lesson in humility that will have his feathers trailing behind him for the rest of his days.


Reviews 2

Booklist Review

Ages 4^-8. In a lively retelling of a traditional folktale from India, the strutting, preening Peacock is put in his place by a shy, modest bird who teaches the braggart that "each of us is special in our own way." Through Kelly's gorgeous, detailed watercolor-and-gouache paintings, Peacock's huge, shimmering fan of feathers spreads across the pages, taking over the animals' world. The eyes on Peacock's tail dazzle and defeat the evil viper snake, and all the birds are grateful that their water hole is safe, but then the conceited, foolish Peacock demands so much attention that the birds have to teach him a lesson. Like the art, the words do a great job of describing the foolish show-off strutting and parading around. There is a satisfying turnaround when the plain, modest black Koel bird reveals that there is grace and beauty where you least expect it. In an afterword, Kajpust talks about the peacock in Indian folklore, its flamboyant natural beauty, and its raucous shrieking voice. --Hazel Rochman


Booklist Review

Ages 4^-8. In a lively retelling of a traditional folktale from India, the strutting, preening Peacock is put in his place by a shy, modest bird who teaches the braggart that "each of us is special in our own way." Through Kelly's gorgeous, detailed watercolor-and-gouache paintings, Peacock's huge, shimmering fan of feathers spreads across the pages, taking over the animals' world. The eyes on Peacock's tail dazzle and defeat the evil viper snake, and all the birds are grateful that their water hole is safe, but then the conceited, foolish Peacock demands so much attention that the birds have to teach him a lesson. Like the art, the words do a great job of describing the foolish show-off strutting and parading around. There is a satisfying turnaround when the plain, modest black Koel bird reveals that there is grace and beauty where you least expect it. In an afterword, Kajpust talks about the peacock in Indian folklore, its flamboyant natural beauty, and its raucous shrieking voice. --Hazel Rochman


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