Cover image for The history of Black business in America : capitalism, race, entrepreneurship
Title:
The history of Black business in America : capitalism, race, entrepreneurship
Author:
Walker, Juliet E. K., 1940-
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
New York : Macmillan Library Reference USA ; London : Prentice Hall International, [1998]

©1998
Physical Description:
xxv, 482 pages ; 27 cm.
Language:
English
ISBN:
9780805716504
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Central Library HD2358.5.U6 W345 1998 Adult Non-Fiction Non-Fiction Area
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Central Library HD2358.5.U6 W345 1998 Adult Non-Fiction Non-Fiction Area-Reference
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Central Library HD2358.5.U6 W345 1998 Adult Non-Fiction Central Closed Stacks
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East Delavan Branch Library HD2358.5.U6 W345 1998 Adult Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Frank E. Merriweather Library HD2358.5.U6 W345 1998 Adult Non-Fiction Black History Non-Circ
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On Order

Summary

Summary

Series Editor: Kenneth Lipartito, University of Houston 1999 Gustavus Myers Outstanding Book Award, Honorable Mention 1999 Association of Black Women Historians (ABWH) Letitia Woods Brown Prize for best Book published by a Black Woman Historian/Best Book Published on African American Women's History 1999 American Association of Publishers Scholarly and Professional Division, Award in Business and Management Category 1999 CHOICE Outstanding Academic Book in African and African American Studies 1999 Black Caucus of the American Library Association 1998 Award for Outstanding Publication 1998 CHOICE Outstanding Academic Book in Management and Labor With in-depth surveys on business trends and waves of industrial progress, this series offers a critical look at the practices and evolution of the business world.


Reviews 1

Choice Review

It is rare for a single volume to combine breadth, near encyclopedic quantities of information, and interpretive insight. This book does just that. Beginning with an overview of business enterprises in 17th- and 18th-century Africa, the author concludes that Africans were involved in business and the business of the slave trade even as Africa became part of the transatlantic economy. Walker (history, Univ. of Illinois at Urbana) describes the enterprises of slave and free black alike, noting both proscription and entrepreneurship. She documents the development of post-Civil War African American owned businesses catering primarily to blacks and argues that proscriptive limits continued throughout the next century as black entrepreneurs attempted to be fuller economic participants. Diverse black business success did occur and not all catered to a black clientele. The volume concludes with an important interpretive treatment of the federal involvement in the promotion of African American business as well as the impact of internationalization. The author does not equivocate in the contemporary debates over the role of minority businesses. The volume benefits from a thorough reading of secondary literature, newspapers, travel accounts, financial records such as those of Dun and Bradstreet, and census materials. Highly recommended for all collections. T. F. Armstrong; Texas Wesleyan University


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