Cover image for Wheels of fortune : the story of rubber in Akron
Title:
Wheels of fortune : the story of rubber in Akron
Author:
Love, Steve, 1946-
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
Akron, Ohio : University of Akron Press, 1999.
Physical Description:
xiv, 359 pages : illustrations ; 29 cm.
Language:
English
ISBN:
9781884836374

9781884836381
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Central Library HD9161.U53 A385 1999 Adult Non-Fiction Central Closed Stacks-Oversize
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Summary

Summary

For over a century after Dr Benjamin Franklin Goodrich came to town in 1870, Akron was the Rubber Capital of the World. Its people worked in the rubber shops of Goodrich, Goodyear, Firestone, General, Seiberling, Mohawk, and Sun. They lived in Goodyear Heights and Firestone Park, the neighborhoods fostered by their employers.


Author Notes

David Giffels is a staff writer for the Akron Beacon Journal. A native of Akron, Giffels completed B.A.s in English and Mass Media and an M.A. in English from The University of Akron.


Reviews 1

Booklist Review

Its tire-manufacturing jobs have disappeared, and the familiar names of companies formerly headquartered there now belong to foreign owners. But Akron, Ohio, continues to be known as "the rubber capital of the world." Although its "Big Four" tire companies have been profiled individually, no thorough story of Akron and its once vital and thriving tire and rubber industry has ever been told before. This history of Akron's people and its commerce, which was originally published in Akron's Beacon Journal as a weekly series beginning in spring 1996 and running for a year, is spiritedly told with affection by two of the newspaper's staff writers. Love and Giffels recount a tale of struggle, survival, and loss, showing how the impact of the Depression, World War II, and the decline of manufacturing was magnified in this one-industry town. Their story is also one of rebirth as the University of Akron has become a growing center for polymer research. Richly illustrated with photographs from the newspaper archives. --David Rouse


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