Cover image for The Encyclopedia of popular music
Title:
The Encyclopedia of popular music
Author:
Larkin, Colin.
Edition:
Third edition.
Publication Information:
London ; New York : Muze ; New York : Distribution in the USA by Grove's Dictionaries, 1998.
Physical Description:
8 volumes (6653 pages) ; 27 cm
General Note:
Earlier ed. published under title: The Guinness encyclopedia of popular music. Enfield, Middlesex, England : Guinness Pub., 1992.
Language:
English
Contents:
v. 1. A Band of Angels-Burnel, Jean Jacques -- v. 2. Burnett, Carol-Dusty, Slim -- v. 3. Dutch Swing College Band-Heptones -- v. 4. Herbal Mixture-Louvin Brothers -- v. 5. Louvin, Charlie-Paul, Clarence -- v. 6. Paul, Emmanuel-Smith, Larry -- v. 7. Smith, Leo-Wildchild -- v. 8. Wilde, Kim-ZZ Top.
Added Author:
Added Uniform Title:
Guinness encyclopedia of popular music.
ISBN:
9780333741344

9781561592371
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Central Library ML102.P66 G84 1998 V.5 Adult Non-Fiction Central Closed Stacks-Non circulating
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Central Library ML102.P66 G84 1998 V.6 Adult Non-Fiction Central Closed Stacks-Non circulating
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Central Library ML102.P66 G84 1998 V.7 Adult Non-Fiction Central Closed Stacks-Non circulating
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Central Library ML102.P66 G84 1998 V.8 Adult Non-Fiction Central Closed Stacks-Non circulating
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Central Library ML102.P66 G84 1998 V.4 Adult Non-Fiction Central Closed Stacks-Non circulating
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Central Library ML102.P66 G84 1998 V.3 Adult Non-Fiction Central Closed Stacks-Non circulating
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Central Library ML102.P66 G84 1998 V.2 Adult Non-Fiction Central Closed Stacks-Non circulating
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Central Library ML102.P66 G84 1998 V.1 Adult Non-Fiction Grosvenor Room-Reference
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On Order

Summary

Summary

This comprehensive reference work on popular music includes all the significant popular music artists of the 20th century. The 18,000 entries each include a biography, discography, record label details and a compilation album listing. There are also essays on popular music genres, record companies, festivals and cities.


Summary

The Encyclopedia of Popular Music is the most thorough reference work on the music that has formed the soundtrack of this century. Covering both mega-star and little-known performers, the Encyclopedia includes jazz, rock, country, folk, rap, blues, stage and film musicals, heavy metal, punk, techno, and unique coverage of world music and reggae. Selected by Library Journal as a Best Reference Source in its two previous editions, The Encyclopedia of Popular Music has established itself as the definitive reference for libraries, broadcasters, recording industry professionals, musicians, and scholars in music history and cultural studies. Expanded to eight volumes, the Third Edition includes over 18,000 articles ranging in length from 150 to 5,000 words and covers performers, composers, producers, record companies, events, venues, and magazines. The discographies, lists of films and videos, sources for further reading, and bold-faced cross-references provide invaluable tools for research.


Reviews 8

Booklist Review

Larkin's new edition contains more than 27,000 entries, including 6,000 new ones and updates of many existing ones. The most comprehensive guide to popular music, this work includes virtually all well-known artists as well as thousands who are lesser known. The set has grown from 4 volumes to 10 since the first edition appeared, in 1992. The third edition was published in 1998. Although the set is international in scope, the majority of the featured artists are from the U.S and the UK, arguably the most important sources of what we call popular music. In addition to providing biographical and artistic information about musicians, entries list album titles with release dates, recording labels, and a five-star rating system. The ratings indicate a comparison between the various works of one artist or group, not between the works of different artists. Larkin also includes entries for specific musical styles, record companies, Broadway musicals, and music-related films, such as This Is Spinal Tap. Most entries are one or two paragraphs in length, with longer ones for the most popular and prolific performers and broader topics. This is an exhaustive survey of popular music. Larkin has spent nearly 40 years writing about, producing, and performing music, and his expertise is well respected. Keeping track of a continually changing industry is not an easy task. Decisions about whether to add or delete artists are based on years of familiarity with music of different styles and the ability to discern the important from the fleeting. Genres included are pop, country, reggae, jazz, Broadway, world music, and light classical, with diverse entries ranging from composer George Auric (1899-1983) to the more recently famous Simon Cowell, of American Idol. Some other changes from the previous edition are worth noting. Both the song/album title and general indexes have increased by at least half. Larkin demonstrates his ability to remain current by more than doubling the artist and genre bibliography, from 91 to 230 pages, and he also added more than 4,500 short reviews of albums that he was not able to detail in the main artist entries. In 2007 the work will be added as a subscription product to the Grove Music Online database, putting it side-by-side with the most important music reference works. Highly recommended for public and academic libraries. --Steven York Copyright 2007 Booklist


Library Journal Review

Those who have followed the progress of this excellent work (an LJ Best Reference Book in 1992 as The Guinness Encyclopedia of Popular Music; 2d ed., 1995) assume that Larkin will not disappoint, and here he delivers a monumental and quite handsome update. Anyone unfamiliar with this guide to 20th-century "nonclassical" music‘rock, pop, rap, reggae, jazz, country, musical theater, etc.‘will be staggered at the breadth and depth of the material. The third edition features 18,500 unsigned entries, normally 150 to 3000 words in length, including 4500 entirely new articles, with updates throughout. In comparison, the 14,500-entry 1992 edition now seems minuscule. Larkin continues to include performers, composers, producers, labels, companies, events, venues, films, and videos. One-hit wonders abound, and the international coverage is a model for all musical reference works. The index is now over 350 pages, with a song index of 50,000 titles, a relief for those confronting "who sang what?" questions. As with earlier editions, this is remarkably up-to-date, although additional "where are they now?" information would be welcome in future editions. Two other significant modifications have been made since 1995. For the first time, accompanying discographies list record labels and feature a five-star rating system; release dates of all recordings continue from earlier editions. The expansion into eight volumes also means that each volume is less unwieldy than before, although more shelf space is required for the set. Even without these new features, this is an acquisition without equal for all academic and public libraries and will easily replace either earlier edition.‘Anthony J. Adam, Prairie View A&M Univ. Lib., TX (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


School Library Journal Review

Gr 7 Up--The creation of this edition was clearly a monumental task and a labor of love for the editor, whose passion for and knowledge of popular music are first made evident in the introductory material. Within its alphabetical, cross-referenced arrangement, this ambitious work provides over 27,000 entries, including 6,000 that are new to this edition. Every aspect of popular music is covered, from Broadway show tunes and rap to heavy metal and big band, from the 1900s to today. The set provides information on artists and other important figures such as producers and songwriters. Entries encapsulate their subjects well even given length limitations. The six-page entry on the Beatles, for example, is concise yet comprehensive, as is the entry on Bob Dylan, which gives readers a clear sense of the man. Larkin and his contributors provide evaluations, using phrases such as "superbly crafted," to describe an album. The writing is always entertaining even when covering less-exciting career details. Each entry concludes with a comprehensive, rated discography covering all mediums and formats produced by the artist, and some also have further-reading lists. The main entries take up eight of this encyclopedia's volumes. The ninth volume provides a healthy quantity of selected album reviews, again presented alphabetically by artist, along with a bibliography, and the final volume is a set index. This title will be invaluable for research.--Tim Wadham, Maricopa County Library District, Phoenix, AZ (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted. All rights reserved.


Choice Review

With some 18,500 alphabetical entries representing every kind of popular music since 1900--rock, country, jazz, soul, blues, reggae, show music, etc.--updates and new entries have expanded this edition by two volumes. Entries for bands or individuals give career summaries (dates and places of birth and death accompany the latter), commentary, discographies, and videographies. Recorded collections are rated on a five-star system; some 1,500 key recordings have their own entries. Appendixes include bibliographies for artists and subjects, a list of selected fanzines, and song title and general indexes. Some entries are alphabetized by article: A Flock of Seagulls appears under "A" with no cross-reference under "F." Logically therefore, The Troggs should file with other entries under "The," but that is reserved mainly for album titles ("The Basement Tapes"). As with any reference of this size and ambition, there is much with which to quibble, from the uncredited subjective comments of the contributors to factual errors. In such a monumental effort, the problems are overborne by the sheer vitality of the work. It is fun and informative, and essential for any library that serves readers interested in popular music. A. Ellis; Northern Kentucky University


Booklist Review

Larkin's new edition contains more than 27,000 entries, including 6,000 new ones and updates of many existing ones. The most comprehensive guide to popular music, this work includes virtually all well-known artists as well as thousands who are lesser known. The set has grown from 4 volumes to 10 since the first edition appeared, in 1992. The third edition was published in 1998. Although the set is international in scope, the majority of the featured artists are from the U.S and the UK, arguably the most important sources of what we call popular music. In addition to providing biographical and artistic information about musicians, entries list album titles with release dates, recording labels, and a five-star rating system. The ratings indicate a comparison between the various works of one artist or group, not between the works of different artists. Larkin also includes entries for specific musical styles, record companies, Broadway musicals, and music-related films, such as This Is Spinal Tap. Most entries are one or two paragraphs in length, with longer ones for the most popular and prolific performers and broader topics. This is an exhaustive survey of popular music. Larkin has spent nearly 40 years writing about, producing, and performing music, and his expertise is well respected. Keeping track of a continually changing industry is not an easy task. Decisions about whether to add or delete artists are based on years of familiarity with music of different styles and the ability to discern the important from the fleeting. Genres included are pop, country, reggae, jazz, Broadway, world music, and light classical, with diverse entries ranging from composer George Auric (1899-1983) to the more recently famous Simon Cowell, of American Idol. Some other changes from the previous edition are worth noting. Both the song/album title and general indexes have increased by at least half. Larkin demonstrates his ability to remain current by more than doubling the artist and genre bibliography, from 91 to 230 pages, and he also added more than 4,500 short reviews of albums that he was not able to detail in the main artist entries. In 2007 the work will be added as a subscription product to the Grove Music Online database, putting it side-by-side with the most important music reference works. Highly recommended for public and academic libraries. --Steven York Copyright 2007 Booklist


Library Journal Review

Those who have followed the progress of this excellent work (an LJ Best Reference Book in 1992 as The Guinness Encyclopedia of Popular Music; 2d ed., 1995) assume that Larkin will not disappoint, and here he delivers a monumental and quite handsome update. Anyone unfamiliar with this guide to 20th-century "nonclassical" music‘rock, pop, rap, reggae, jazz, country, musical theater, etc.‘will be staggered at the breadth and depth of the material. The third edition features 18,500 unsigned entries, normally 150 to 3000 words in length, including 4500 entirely new articles, with updates throughout. In comparison, the 14,500-entry 1992 edition now seems minuscule. Larkin continues to include performers, composers, producers, labels, companies, events, venues, films, and videos. One-hit wonders abound, and the international coverage is a model for all musical reference works. The index is now over 350 pages, with a song index of 50,000 titles, a relief for those confronting "who sang what?" questions. As with earlier editions, this is remarkably up-to-date, although additional "where are they now?" information would be welcome in future editions. Two other significant modifications have been made since 1995. For the first time, accompanying discographies list record labels and feature a five-star rating system; release dates of all recordings continue from earlier editions. The expansion into eight volumes also means that each volume is less unwieldy than before, although more shelf space is required for the set. Even without these new features, this is an acquisition without equal for all academic and public libraries and will easily replace either earlier edition.‘Anthony J. Adam, Prairie View A&M Univ. Lib., TX (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


School Library Journal Review

Gr 7 Up--The creation of this edition was clearly a monumental task and a labor of love for the editor, whose passion for and knowledge of popular music are first made evident in the introductory material. Within its alphabetical, cross-referenced arrangement, this ambitious work provides over 27,000 entries, including 6,000 that are new to this edition. Every aspect of popular music is covered, from Broadway show tunes and rap to heavy metal and big band, from the 1900s to today. The set provides information on artists and other important figures such as producers and songwriters. Entries encapsulate their subjects well even given length limitations. The six-page entry on the Beatles, for example, is concise yet comprehensive, as is the entry on Bob Dylan, which gives readers a clear sense of the man. Larkin and his contributors provide evaluations, using phrases such as "superbly crafted," to describe an album. The writing is always entertaining even when covering less-exciting career details. Each entry concludes with a comprehensive, rated discography covering all mediums and formats produced by the artist, and some also have further-reading lists. The main entries take up eight of this encyclopedia's volumes. The ninth volume provides a healthy quantity of selected album reviews, again presented alphabetically by artist, along with a bibliography, and the final volume is a set index. This title will be invaluable for research.--Tim Wadham, Maricopa County Library District, Phoenix, AZ (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted. All rights reserved.


Choice Review

With some 18,500 alphabetical entries representing every kind of popular music since 1900--rock, country, jazz, soul, blues, reggae, show music, etc.--updates and new entries have expanded this edition by two volumes. Entries for bands or individuals give career summaries (dates and places of birth and death accompany the latter), commentary, discographies, and videographies. Recorded collections are rated on a five-star system; some 1,500 key recordings have their own entries. Appendixes include bibliographies for artists and subjects, a list of selected fanzines, and song title and general indexes. Some entries are alphabetized by article: A Flock of Seagulls appears under "A" with no cross-reference under "F." Logically therefore, The Troggs should file with other entries under "The," but that is reserved mainly for album titles ("The Basement Tapes"). As with any reference of this size and ambition, there is much with which to quibble, from the uncredited subjective comments of the contributors to factual errors. In such a monumental effort, the problems are overborne by the sheer vitality of the work. It is fun and informative, and essential for any library that serves readers interested in popular music. A. Ellis; Northern Kentucky University


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