Cover image for To capture the wind
Title:
To capture the wind
Author:
MacGill-Callahan, Sheila.
Personal Author:
Edition:
First edition.
Publication Information:
New York, NY : Dial Books for Young Readers, [1997]

©1997
Physical Description:
1 volume (unpaged) : color illustrations ; 29 cm
Summary:
In a risky plan to free her kidnapped lover, Oonagh cleverly solves the evil pirate king's riddles, unites the princess Ethne with her lover, and invents sails.
Language:
English
Program Information:
Accelerated Reader AR LG 3.7 0.5 21524.
Added Author:
ISBN:
9780803715417

9780803715424
Format :
Book

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Central Library PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Central Closed Stacks
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Summary

Summary

In a risky plan to free her kidnapped lover, Oonagh cleverly solves the evil pirate king's riddles, unites the princess Ethne with her lover, and invents sails.


Summary

In a risky plan to free her kidnapped lover, Oonagh cleverly solves the evil pirate king's riddles, unites the princess Ethne with her lover, and invents sails.


Author Notes

Sheila MacGill-Gallahan is the award-winning author of many Dial books, including And Still the Turtle Watched , illustrated by Barry Moser, and The Children of Lir , illustrated by Gennady Spirin. She lives in Far Rockaway, New York. copyright ? 2000 by Penguin Putnam Books for Young Readers. All rights reserved.


Reviews 6

Booklist Review

Gr. 3^-5. A farmer rescues her fianceand turns the tables on a pirate king in this stylish but truncated swashbuckler. When Oonagh hears that Conal, her intended, has been snatched by Malcolm's men, she sets out for the pirates' island. On the way, Oonagh meets a princess in love with Malcolm's son, Aidan. At the castle, Oonagh pretends that she's set her cap for Aidan, whereupon Malcolm gives her four riddles to solve. Oonagh answers three, and for the last, organizes an escape. In his picture-book debut, illustrator Gregory Manchess draws heavily on Howard Pyle, by way of David Shannon, creating shadowy, theatrical oil paintings of scowling brigands and larger-than-life figures. The style is appropriate, but the artist shows little awareness of the story's high spots, contributing two scenes of slaves sneaking off, but none showing Oonagh facing Malcolm in his hall. Economically told, this original picture book for older readers has flaws: a lull in the wind that delays the escape is too brief to create any drama, and Malcolm becomes a doting parent after the (unillustrated) double wedding. Pair this with Jane Yolen's better book, Ballad of the Pirate Queens (1995). --John Peters


Publisher's Weekly Review

MacGill-Callahan (The Children of Lir) combines the flavor of a traditional tale with a few gender reversals in this spirited story. Here, an Irish farm woman rescues her kidnapped beloved from a pirate king. Resourceful Oonagh learns that if she claims to seek the pirate king's son's hand in marriage, she will be set four riddles to answer‘and given four weeks to come up with a rescue plan for herself and her intended. She handles the first three riddles with ease, and the final riddle‘"How do you capture the wind on the water?"‘leads her to invent sails, which enables the prisoners' escape by boat. The simple, occasionally poetic prose ("White, blue, and scarlet wings blossom over the boats" when the sails are raised) maintains a lively clip. Manchess debuts with brushy, impressionistic oils that give the characters a stalwart, rough-hewn look. An often luxuriant sense of color, strongly modeled forms, unusual angles and dramatic close-ups also make his work more robust than a more strictly realistic treatment.While fairy tale lovers will find the structure of this story familiar, its animated revisions offer welcome twists on well-worn formulas. Ages 4-8. (Sept.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


School Library Journal Review

Gr 1-3‘Oonagh's life is a happy one until the day that Malcolm, the pirate king, captures the best weavers and needleworkers of Ireland, including her betrothed, and carries them off to his island. After a princess (whose true love is also a prisoner) describes her experiences in Malcolm's clutches, Oonagh devises a plan to free the slaves and travels to the brigands' stronghold. Once there, she agrees to answer the pirate's demand that she solve four riddles in four weeks. During her month on the island, she wins Malcolm's approval with three clever answers. Her final response to the fourth riddle, "How do you capture the wind on the water?" becomes obvious when the prisoners make their perilous but ultimately successful escape using Oonagh's invention, which is also the riddle's answer‘sails. This original story is presented in lyrical language that captures the traditional cadence of much-told tales. The text is so lean, however, that it occasionally moves from scene to scene without the background required to lend coherence to events. The accompanying oil paintings on full- and double-page spreads use color and bold brushwork in a manner reminiscent of N. C. Wyeth. The strong contrast of light and dark, heroic perspectives, and hollow-eyed pirates combine to add drama and depth to the spare prose. Well suited to reading aloud, this story will satisfy armchair adventurers with its resourceful heroine and swashbuckling intrigue.‘Carol Ann Wilson, Westfield Memorial Library, NJ (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Booklist Review

Gr. 3^-5. A farmer rescues her fianceand turns the tables on a pirate king in this stylish but truncated swashbuckler. When Oonagh hears that Conal, her intended, has been snatched by Malcolm's men, she sets out for the pirates' island. On the way, Oonagh meets a princess in love with Malcolm's son, Aidan. At the castle, Oonagh pretends that she's set her cap for Aidan, whereupon Malcolm gives her four riddles to solve. Oonagh answers three, and for the last, organizes an escape. In his picture-book debut, illustrator Gregory Manchess draws heavily on Howard Pyle, by way of David Shannon, creating shadowy, theatrical oil paintings of scowling brigands and larger-than-life figures. The style is appropriate, but the artist shows little awareness of the story's high spots, contributing two scenes of slaves sneaking off, but none showing Oonagh facing Malcolm in his hall. Economically told, this original picture book for older readers has flaws: a lull in the wind that delays the escape is too brief to create any drama, and Malcolm becomes a doting parent after the (unillustrated) double wedding. Pair this with Jane Yolen's better book, Ballad of the Pirate Queens (1995). --John Peters


Publisher's Weekly Review

MacGill-Callahan (The Children of Lir) combines the flavor of a traditional tale with a few gender reversals in this spirited story. Here, an Irish farm woman rescues her kidnapped beloved from a pirate king. Resourceful Oonagh learns that if she claims to seek the pirate king's son's hand in marriage, she will be set four riddles to answer‘and given four weeks to come up with a rescue plan for herself and her intended. She handles the first three riddles with ease, and the final riddle‘"How do you capture the wind on the water?"‘leads her to invent sails, which enables the prisoners' escape by boat. The simple, occasionally poetic prose ("White, blue, and scarlet wings blossom over the boats" when the sails are raised) maintains a lively clip. Manchess debuts with brushy, impressionistic oils that give the characters a stalwart, rough-hewn look. An often luxuriant sense of color, strongly modeled forms, unusual angles and dramatic close-ups also make his work more robust than a more strictly realistic treatment.While fairy tale lovers will find the structure of this story familiar, its animated revisions offer welcome twists on well-worn formulas. Ages 4-8. (Sept.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


School Library Journal Review

Gr 1-3‘Oonagh's life is a happy one until the day that Malcolm, the pirate king, captures the best weavers and needleworkers of Ireland, including her betrothed, and carries them off to his island. After a princess (whose true love is also a prisoner) describes her experiences in Malcolm's clutches, Oonagh devises a plan to free the slaves and travels to the brigands' stronghold. Once there, she agrees to answer the pirate's demand that she solve four riddles in four weeks. During her month on the island, she wins Malcolm's approval with three clever answers. Her final response to the fourth riddle, "How do you capture the wind on the water?" becomes obvious when the prisoners make their perilous but ultimately successful escape using Oonagh's invention, which is also the riddle's answer‘sails. This original story is presented in lyrical language that captures the traditional cadence of much-told tales. The text is so lean, however, that it occasionally moves from scene to scene without the background required to lend coherence to events. The accompanying oil paintings on full- and double-page spreads use color and bold brushwork in a manner reminiscent of N. C. Wyeth. The strong contrast of light and dark, heroic perspectives, and hollow-eyed pirates combine to add drama and depth to the spare prose. Well suited to reading aloud, this story will satisfy armchair adventurers with its resourceful heroine and swashbuckling intrigue.‘Carol Ann Wilson, Westfield Memorial Library, NJ (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


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