Cover image for HIV and community mental healthcare
Title:
HIV and community mental healthcare
Author:
Knox, Michael D.
Publication Information:
Baltimore : Johns Hopkins University Press, 1998.
Physical Description:
xv, 300 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm
Language:
English
ISBN:
9780801858031

9780801858048
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Central Library RC607.A26 H5688 1998 Adult Non-Fiction Central Closed Stacks
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Summary

Summary

HIV/AIDS affects people psychologically like no other disease. HIV-infected persons can experience a wide range of psychological and neuropsychological problems that require mental health treatment. At times, their family, friends, and healthcare workers may need mental health services. People at risk of infection may also benefit from mental health intervention. In HIV and Community Mental Healthcare, Michael D. Knox and Caroline H. Sparks bring together a distinguished group of contributors in the first book on the unique contributions to prevention and treatment that community mental healthcare workers may make to persons affected by HIV. The authors begin by discussing basic aspects of HIV disease with which mental health clinicians need to be familiar, such as epidemiology, law, ethics, detection, and transmission. They then address mental health interventions for stress, depression, and suicide. Special topics include women and HIV, multicultural issues, mental illness, and drug abuse. HIV and Community Mental Healthcare is an interdisciplinary handbook for practitioners as well as a course textbook for students. The book will be of interest to mental healthcare professionals, including psychiatrists, psychologists, social workers, nurses, and counselors. It is intended to help this audience improve their ability to care for persons affected by HIV and AIDS.


Summary

HIV/AIDS affects people psychologically like no other disease. HIV-infected persons can experience a wide range of psychological and neuropsychological problems that require mental health treatment. At times, their family, friends, and healthcare workers may need mental health services. People at risk of infection may also benefit from mental health intervention. In HIV and Community Mental Healthcare, Michael D. Knox and Caroline H. Sparks bring together a distinguished group of contributors in the first book on the unique contributions to prevention and treatment that community mental healthcare workers may make to persons affected by HIV.

The authors begin by discussing basic aspects of HIV disease with which mental health clinicians need to be familiar, such as epidemiology, law, ethics, detection, and transmission. They then address mental health interventions for stress, depression, and suicide. Special topics include women and HIV, multicultural issues, mental illness, and drug abuse. HIV and Community Mental Healthcare is an interdisciplinary handbook for practitioners as well as a course textbook for students. The book will be of interest to mental healthcare professionals, including psychiatrists, psychologists, social workers, nurses, and counselors. It is intended to help this audience improve their ability to care for persons affected by HIV and AIDS.


Author Notes

Michael D. Knox is professor of community mental health and professor of medicine at the University of South Florida and director of the U.S.F. Center for HIV Education and Research. Caroline H. Sparks is assistant research professor in the Department of Prevention and Community Health at the School of Public Health, George Washington University.


Reviews 2

Choice Review

This survey of HIV in simplistic form is suitable for use as a text. Though each chapter, on subjects ranging from the etiology and epidemiology of HIV to preparing a client or patient for death, is written by one or more specialists on the subject matter, there is a remarkable consistency in presentation. Each contribution begins with a one-paragraph overview, followed by a list of learning objectives, then a numbered outline of the contents. The text itself is broken down by each subject listed in the outline. Each chapter ends with a one-paragraph conclusion, a set of review questions, and a list of references and suggested readings. This not only makes for considerable repetition in each chapter but also tends to discourage anything more than superficial exploration of any of the controversies in the field. The book is divided into four sections: "The Challenge of HIV for Community Health"; "Understanding HIV Health Care"; " Mental Health Interventions"; and " Special Topics." This last section deals with special needs or problems of drug addicts, women, individuals from different cultural settings, and those who are mentally ill. An appendix lists HIV/AIDS hot lines by individual states as well as those for Canada, and a large variety and number of volunteer agencies that operate on the national level. General readers; undergraduates. V. L. Bullough University of Southern California


Choice Review

This survey of HIV in simplistic form is suitable for use as a text. Though each chapter, on subjects ranging from the etiology and epidemiology of HIV to preparing a client or patient for death, is written by one or more specialists on the subject matter, there is a remarkable consistency in presentation. Each contribution begins with a one-paragraph overview, followed by a list of learning objectives, then a numbered outline of the contents. The text itself is broken down by each subject listed in the outline. Each chapter ends with a one-paragraph conclusion, a set of review questions, and a list of references and suggested readings. This not only makes for considerable repetition in each chapter but also tends to discourage anything more than superficial exploration of any of the controversies in the field. The book is divided into four sections: "The Challenge of HIV for Community Health"; "Understanding HIV Health Care"; " Mental Health Interventions"; and " Special Topics." This last section deals with special needs or problems of drug addicts, women, individuals from different cultural settings, and those who are mentally ill. An appendix lists HIV/AIDS hot lines by individual states as well as those for Canada, and a large variety and number of volunteer agencies that operate on the national level. General readers; undergraduates. V. L. Bullough University of Southern California


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