Cover image for Animal play : evolutionary, comparative, and ecological prespectives
Title:
Animal play : evolutionary, comparative, and ecological prespectives
Author:
Bekoff, Marc.
Publication Information:
Cambridge, [England] ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 1998.
Physical Description:
xvi, 274 pages : illustrations ; 23 cm
Language:
English
Contents:
The evolutionary origins of play revisited: lessons from turtles / Gordon M. Burghardt -- Play in common ravens (Corvus corax) / Bernard Heinrich & Rachel Smolker -- Object play by adult animals / Sarah L. Hall -- Kangaroos at play: play behaviour in the Macropodoidea / Duncan M. Watson -- Intentional communication and social play: how and why animals negotiate and agree to play / Marc Bekoff & Colin Allen -- Structure-function interface in the analysis of play fighting / Sergio M. Pellis & Vivien C. Pellis -- Sparring as play in young pronghorn males / Michelle N. Miller & John A. Byers -- Squirrel monkey play fighting: making the case for a cognitive training function for play / Maxeen Biben -- Self assessment in juvenile play / Katerina V. Thompson -- Biological effects of locomotor play: getting into shape, or something more specific? / John A. Byers -- Neurobiological substrates of play behavior: glimpses into the structure and function of mammalian playfulness / Stephen M. Siviy -- Play as an organizing principle: clinical evidence and personal observations / Stuart Brown.
ISBN:
9780521583831

9780521586566
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Central Library QL763.5 .A54 1998 Adult Non-Fiction Non-Fiction Area
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Summary

Summary

Why do animals play? Play has been described in animals as diverse as reptiles, birds and mammals, so what benefits does it provide and how did it evolve? Careful, quantitative studies of social, locomotor and object play behaviour are now beginning to answer these questions and to shed light on many other aspects of both animal and human behaviour. This interdisciplinary volume, first published in 1998, brings together the major findings about play in a wide range of species including humans. Topics about play include the evolutionary history of play, play structure, function and development, and sex and individual differences. Animal Play is destined to become the benchmark volume in this subject, and will provide a source of inspiration and understanding for students and researchers in behavioural biology, neurobiology, psychology and anthropology.


Reviews 1

Choice Review

This volume is not only interdisciplinary but also manages to be instructively comparative in a broad sense, e.g., ranging from turtles to kangaroos, and not neglecting humans. It covers general areas that properly disregard traditional disciplines, such as the structure, biological roles, development, and sex differences of play behavior in a great range of vertebrates. There are 12 chapters, each of which manages to look at different aspects of play behavior in different taxa. This breadth and the accompanying list of references assure great usefulness for this volume. It is also a mental stimulant for students who are perhaps too narrowly entrenched in some research in various areas of ethology, neurobiology, psychology and behavioral medicine, or biological and cultural anthropology. In the Lorenzian tradition, many of the chapters are informally written, but this does not detract from their insights or scholarly depth. An enjoyable and affordable compendium. Upper-division undergraduates through faculty. F. S. Szalay; CUNY Hunter College


Table of Contents

1 Introduction
2 The evolutionary origins of play revisited: lessons from turtlesG. M. Burghardt
3 Play in common ravens (Corvus corax)B. Heinrich and R. Smolker
4 Object play by adult animalsB. Heinrich and R. Smolker
5 Kangaroos at play: play behaviour in the MacropodoideaD. M. Watson
6 Intentional communication and social play: how and why animals negotiate and agree to playM. Bekoff and C. Allen
7 The structure-function interface in the analysis of play fightingS. M. Pellis and V. C. Pellis
8 Sparring as play in young pronghorn malesM. N. Miller and J. A. Byers
9 Squirrel monkey playfighting: making the case for a cognitive training hypothesisM. Biben
10 Self assessment in juvenile playK. V. Thompson
11 Biological effects of locomotor play: getting into shape, or something more specific?J. A. Byers
12 Neurobiological substrates of play behaviour: glimpses into the structure and function of mammalian playfulnessS. M. Siviy
13 Play as an organizing principle: clinical evidence and personal observationsS. Brown

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