Cover image for Ashes to ashes : the history of smoking and health : Symposium and Witness Seminar organized by the Wellcome Institute for the History of Medicine and the History of Twentieth Century Medicine Group on 26-27 April 1995
Title:
Ashes to ashes : the history of smoking and health : Symposium and Witness Seminar organized by the Wellcome Institute for the History of Medicine and the History of Twentieth Century Medicine Group on 26-27 April 1995
Author:
Lock, Stephen.
Publication Information:
Amsterdam ; Atlanta, Ga. : Rodopi, 1998.
Physical Description:
viii, 244 pages ; 23 cm.
Language:
English
ISBN:
9789042003965

9789042003866
Format :
Book

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Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Central Library RA1242.T6 A84 1998 Adult Non-Fiction Central Closed Stacks
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Summary

Summary

Future historians will wonder why, despite the risks, society persisted in its warm relationship with the cigarette; by the end of the century global consumption was still rising. The 1995 symposium at the Wellcome Institute for the History of Medicine not only examined tobacco's connection with health, but the varied attitudes towards smoking, which have included regarding it as 'manly', relaxing, fashionable - and decadent. A particular feature was a witness seminar attended not only by those who had made the initial discovery but by those with a crucial role in promoting public awareness of the dangers. And, as shown in this book, we still cannot escape the paradox that, while a considerable proportion of a country's population is hooked on the cigarette, the tobacco industry and the government are equally addicted to the profits and tax revenues it generates.


Reviews 1

Choice Review

In April 1995, London's Wellcome Institute for the History of Medicine sponsored a two-day symposium on the history of smoking and health. This book includes not only the presentations but also the discussions, notes, and sources. With the exception of Allan M. Brandt's "Blow Some My Way," which argues that in American during the 1980s and 1990s the discovery of the "innocent victims" of passive smoking reframed the smoking debate from a health concern to a moral issue, the articles focus on events in Great Britain and, to a lesser extent, Europe. For most of the 19th century and into the 20th, adult male smoking was medically and socially acceptable. Debates over tobacco usually focused on its deleterious effects on child smokers, which led in turn to fears of racial degeneracy. During the 1950s, studies by Richard Doll and Bradford Hill showed the link between smoking and lung cancer and coronary disease. Medical recognition of that claim's validity was, above all, a milestone in the acceptance of statistical epidemiology. Public recognition of that validity--to confront what Jordan Goodman termed tobacco's "webs of dependence"--brought about enormous political, economic, and cultural shifts. Upper-division undergraduates through professionals. T. P. Gariepy Stonehill College


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