Cover image for Jazz
Title:
Jazz
Author:
Cooke, Mervyn.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
New York : Thames and Hudson, 1999.

©1998
Physical Description:
200 pages : illustrations ; 21 cm.
Language:
English
ISBN:
9780500203187
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Central Library ML3561.J3 C66 1999 Adult Non-Fiction Non-Fiction Area
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Clearfield Library ML3561.J3 C66 1999 Adult Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Eggertsville-Snyder Library ML3561.J3 C66 1999 Adult Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Hamburg Library ML3561.J3 C66 1999 Adult Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Kenmore Library ML3561.J3 C66 1999 Adult Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Frank E. Merriweather Library ML3561.J3 C66 1999 Adult Non-Fiction Black History Non-Circ
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Orchard Park Library ML3561.J3 C66 1999 Adult Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Summary

Summary

This guide covers the whole history of jazz, from its early balancing of African and European influences, through the formative years in New Orleans and Chicago, the rise of the big bands in New York, to be-bop, the post-war proliferation of styles from a new generation - hard bop, West Coast, cool, free jazz, modal jazz, fusion and crossover - and today's acceptance of jazz as a music that uniquely defies conventional categories like high and low.


Reviews 1

Library Journal Review

Cooke (music, Univ. of Nottingham) has created this succinct history of jazz for Thames and Hudson's "World of Art" series. As an introductory text, this slim volume works quite well, managing to touch on the major aspects of jazz and its seminal figures from their obscure beginnings to the present. An overwhelming amount of material has been distilled down to a coherent (if somewhat academic) narrative, and well-chosen and well-placed photographs enhance the flow of the material. North American readers will find the European perspective refreshing and at times eccentric, offering an emphasis on players and events sometimes overlooked in the United States. Informed readers or those looking for a fuller treatment will be better served by Ted Gioia's The History of Jazz (LJ 12/97) or Gary Giddin's more idiosyncratic Visions of Jazz (LJ 8/98), but as a starting point for the general reader or introductory jazz course, this book succeeds admirably.‘Mark Woodhouse, Elmira Coll., NY (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


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