Cover image for Greek gods and goddesses
Title:
Greek gods and goddesses
Author:
McCaughrean, Geraldine.
Personal Author:
Edition:
First U.S. edition.
Publication Information:
New York, N.Y. : Margaret K. McElderry Books, 1998.

©1997
Physical Description:
108 pages : color illustrations ; 27 cm
Language:
English
Program Information:
Accelerated Reader AR MG 5.6 3.0 67753.
ISBN:
9780689820847
Format :
Book

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Central Library PZ8.1.M146 GR 1997 Juvenile Non-Fiction Central Closed Stacks
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Niagara Branch Library PZ8.1.M146 GR 1997 Juvenile Non-Fiction Fairy Tales
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Anna M. Reinstein Library PZ8.1.M146 GR 1997 Juvenile Non-Fiction Fairy Tales
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Summary

Summary

Here are fifteen wonderful stories about the Greek gods and goddesses -- Zeus, the most powerful; his wife Hera; and their large, extended family. In the splendid retellings, Geraldine McCaughrean vividly recreates the world of these powerful characters who also possessed human attributes and failings.The collection includes favorite stories such as how Paris judged who was the fairest goddess of all, how the city of Athens was named, and how Phaeton defied his father, the sun god Helios. It also tells some of the lesser-known ones: how the dolphins were created and how Hephaestus won Aphrodite for his wife.The magic and drama of Geraldine McCaughrean's retellings are beautifully matched by Emma Chichester Clark's lively illustrations, in which she brings the characters strikingly to life.


Author Notes

Geraldine McCaughrean was born in Enfield, England on June 6, 1951. She was educated at Christ Church College, Canterbury. She has written more than 160 books and plays for children and adults.

Her writing career includes the retelling of such classics as One Thousand and One Arabian Nights, The Canterbury Tales, and The Bronze Cauldron: Myths and Legends of the World, which is a collection of stories from all over the world. She has received numerous awards including three Whitbread Children's Book Awards for A Little Lower Than the Angels, Gold Dust, and Not the End of the World. She also received the Guardian Prize and Carnegie Medal for A Pack of Lies, the Beefeater Children's Novel Award for Gold Dawn, and the Michael L. Printz Award for The White Darkness.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 2

Booklist Review

Gr. 4^-7. In a follow-up to her 1993 Greek Myths, also illustrated by Emma Chichester Clark, McCaughrean presents a lively, unsentimental, and utterly unstuffy reworking of ancient stories. She tells the stories as if they were being told by Hermes to lull the monster Argus Who Sees All to sleep. Hermes begins with his own story, which recalls his birth and how, on the very same day, he makes the first lyre, "borrows" his brother Apollo's cows, defends himself to Zeus, and wins over vengeful Hera. The personalities of the gods and goddesses are clearly and entertainingly delineated. The watercolors are attractive and gently humorous, and Clark includes an illustration at the beginning of each story that is done in the style of ancient Greek art, as if the subject were a mosaic or statue. The many children who have pored over D'Aulaire's Book of Greek Myths (1962) will enjoy this one enormously as well. --Susan Dove Lempke


School Library Journal Review

Gr 3-6-Following a brief introduction, McCaughrean uses the literary device of a story within a story to relate tales of Greek gods and goddesses. Zeus instructs Hermes to kill Argus, the hundred-eyed creature that Hera has sent to spy on him. In order to get the beast to close all of its eyes, Hermes makes himself comfortable and launches into 15 stories about Zeus's philandering ways and his many offspring, including the births of Dionysus from his thigh and Athena from his forehead. The lively narrative offers accurate accounts of Artemis, Apollo, Demeter, Hephaestus, Aphrodite, and others. Chichester Clark has incorporated stylistic Greek art into her bright watercolor interpretations of the Olympians as they frolic on nearly every page. Readers familiar with this duo's Greek Myths (McElderry, 1993) will recognize the same finesse in the writing and illustrations. Though there are many volumes of Greek mythology available, this one makes a fine introduction with its clear organization, easy-to-follow stories, and touches of humor. Until they are ready for Hesiod, young mythology enthusiasts will be well served by this volume.-Angela J. Reynolds, West Slope Community Library, Portland, OR (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


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