Cover image for Pioneer girl : growing up on the prairie
Title:
Pioneer girl : growing up on the prairie
Author:
Warren, Andrea.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
New York : Morrow Junior Books, [1998]

©1998
Physical Description:
96 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm
Summary:
Tells about the daily life and activities of a pioneer girl growing up on the prairies of Nebraska.
Language:
English
Reading Level:
1020 Lexile.
Program Information:
Accelerated Reader AR MG 6.2 3.0 34739.

Reading Counts RC 6-8 5.8 11 Quiz: 19761 Guided reading level: Z.
ISBN:
9780688154387
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
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Material Type
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Status
Central Library F666.S59 W37 1998 Juvenile Non-Fiction Central Closed Stacks
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Newstead Library F666.S59 W37 1998 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Clarence Library F666.S59 W37 1998 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Crane Branch Library F666.S59 W37 1998 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Hamburg Library F666.S59 W37 1998 Juvenile Non-Fiction Biography
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Marilla Free Library F666.S59 W37 1998 Juvenile Non-Fiction Biography
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Williamsville Library F666.S59 W37 1998 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Summary

Summary

During the late 1800s, many homesteaders were attracted to the middle of the country -- including young Grace McCance and her family. Settling on the lonely, windswept prairie of central Nebraska, they lived in a one-room house, fought off crop-destroying grasshoppers, braved winter blizzards and summertime droughts -- and grew into spirited, self-reliant pioneers. Grace's personal story is skillfully woven into the history of America's great westward migration to create a vivid portrait of childhood on the prairie.


Reviews 2

Booklist Review

Gr. 3-6. The author of Orphan Train Rider: One Boy's True Story (1996) turns her attention to the girlhood of Grace McCance Snyder, who homesteaded with her family near Cozad, Nebraska, in the late 1800s. Warren's account is based on Snyder's memoir, No Time on My Hands (1986), written by her daughter, Nellie Snyder Yost. It follows Grace's experiences living in a soddy, collecting buffalo chips for fuel, battling prairie fires, herding cattle, learning to quilt, surviving a drought, teaching school, and finally becoming a rancher's wife. The family stories are augmented with general information about the life styles of early Nebraskan settlers. Frequent black-and-white illustrations (a combination of family pictures and period photographs and drawings) further enhance the text. An excellent addition to units on the westward movement or for fans of pioneer stories. (Reviewed October 1, 1998)0688154387Kay Weisman


School Library Journal Review

Gr 4-7-Grace McCance's family settled a homestead in Nebraska in 1885, when Grace was three. Her funny, exciting, poignant, and romantic life story, as presented by Warren, is based on McCance's own memoir, No Time on My Hands (Univ. of Nebraska Pr., 1986), and other sources, including family interviews. Reminiscent of Laura Ingalls Wilder's tales of life on the prairie, Grace's story relates hardships and hilarity in a compelling mix. How is a body supposed to relieve the call of nature when privies have yet to be built and there's not so much as a bush or clump of tall grass in sight? The girl survives fire, blizzards, and an attack by an enraged heifer. These close calls as well as the daily trials of bedbugs, dust, and a scarcity of water illustrate the challenges of homesteading. Indians are mentioned only in passing. This is a fine personal portrait of one woman's life and a good read. Excellent-quality archival photos, many of Grace's own family, enhance the well-documented text.-Rebecca O'Connell, Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh, PA (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


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