Cover image for Photography's multiple roles : art, document, market, science
Title:
Photography's multiple roles : art, document, market, science
Author:
Columbia College (Chicago, Ill.). Museum of Contemporary Photography.
Publication Information:
Chicago : Museum of Contemporary Photography, Columbia College ; New York : Dap, Inc., [1998]

©1998
Physical Description:
254 pages : illustrations (some color) ; 29 cm
Language:
English
ISBN:
9780965888714

9780965888721
Format :
Book

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Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Central Library TR187 .M87 1998 Adult Non-Fiction Central Closed Stacks-Oversize
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Summary

Summary

This book explores the multiple roles of photography as viewed through perhaps the single most important collection of American photography of the 1960s, 70s, 80s and 90s -- the permanent collection of The Museum of Contemporary Photography. Isolating the development of postwar photography into four major roles -- artistic expression, documentation, commercial industry, and scientific tool -- this book includes essays by renowned scholars, and features 170 images from such photographers as Diane Arbus, John Coplans, Robert Frank, Dorothea Lange, Lee Friedlander, Irving Penn, Alfredo Jaar, Fazal Sheikh and many more. As an instructive primer on four decades of photography, as a work of extensive research and scholarship, or simply as an unprecedented assemblage of great photography, Photography's Multiple Roles is a monumental and accessible work.


Summary

This monumental book surveys the development of postwar American photography, and isolates four major roles of the medium--artistic expression, journalistic documentation, commercial industry, and scientific tool. With extensive essays from a range of scholars, and work from Arbus, Frank, Lange, Friedlander, and many more, this book represents a major reference work of photo history. "All libraries should consider Photography's Multiple Roles."--Library Journal.


Author Notes

Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi (pronounced "ME-high CHICK-sent-me-high-ee) is a professor and former chairman of the Department of English at the University of Chicago. His writings have focused on models of enjoyment and how various people access their creative potential. The idea of creative potential, which Csikszentmihalyi terms "flow" has become increasingly popular in the public sector. His 1993 book, Flow, inspired Jimmy Johnson then coach of the World Champion Dallas Cowboys, and was the subject of a feature story during that year's Super Bowl television broadcast.

His ideas have also been touted by President Clinton, who called Csikszentmihalyi one of his favorite authors, Newt Gingrich, who put his work on the reading list for a political planning committee, and corporations and cultural institutions, such as Volvo in Sweden and the Chicago Park District. He has published articles in a variety of magazines, including Psychology Today, The New York Times, Omni, and Wired and has made appearances on television in the U.S. and Europe.

Csikszentmihalyi currently serves on boards and commissions for the U.S. Departments of Labor and Education, and the Social Science Research Council. He has held visiting professorships at universities in the United States, Canada, Brazil, Italy, and Finland. He received the1990 NRPA National Research (Roosevelt) Award, in addition to two Senior Fulbright Fellowships.

Besides Flow, he has also written Beyond Boredom and Anxiety and Creativity: Flow and the Psychology of Discovery and Invention, in which he applies his "flow" theory to various inventors, scientists, and artists to determine how and why they achieve "flow."

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 4

Library Journal Review

Museum of Contemporary Photography, dist. by D.A.P. 1998. 256p. permanent paper. photog. index. LC 98-26380. ISBN 0-9658887-2-X. pap. $40. (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Choice Review

This book considers photography as art, document, market, and science. The images are from Columbia College's Museum of Contemporary Photography's permanent collection, accompanied by thought-provoking essays. In particular, readers will enjoy comparing Eugenia Parry's literary and often self-reflexive interpretations of the photographs included with her essay to the objective observations made by Naomi Rosenblum in her essay on documentary photography. The decision to place them back to back was fortuitous. Essays devoted to the scientific and other uses of photography are also excellent. At first glance, the book seems to lack coherence, but in the end, the multiple viewpoints merge and form a coherent whole. Since what we see depends on our point of view, it seems fitting that the book concludes with a series of essays called "Viewpoint." An intelligent work, with reproductions of the highest quality. It is a book worth having. All levels. T. Sexton emeritus, University of Alaska, Anchorage


Library Journal Review

Museum of Contemporary Photography, dist. by D.A.P. 1998. 256p. permanent paper. photog. index. LC 98-26380. ISBN 0-9658887-2-X. pap. $40. (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Choice Review

This book considers photography as art, document, market, and science. The images are from Columbia College's Museum of Contemporary Photography's permanent collection, accompanied by thought-provoking essays. In particular, readers will enjoy comparing Eugenia Parry's literary and often self-reflexive interpretations of the photographs included with her essay to the objective observations made by Naomi Rosenblum in her essay on documentary photography. The decision to place them back to back was fortuitous. Essays devoted to the scientific and other uses of photography are also excellent. At first glance, the book seems to lack coherence, but in the end, the multiple viewpoints merge and form a coherent whole. Since what we see depends on our point of view, it seems fitting that the book concludes with a series of essays called "Viewpoint." An intelligent work, with reproductions of the highest quality. It is a book worth having. All levels. T. Sexton emeritus, University of Alaska, Anchorage


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