Cover image for Ways of seeing
Title:
Ways of seeing
Author:
Berger, John.
Publication Information:
London : British Broadcasting Corporation ; London, England ; New York, N.Y. : Penguin Books, [1972]

©1972
Physical Description:
166 pages : illustrations ; 20 cm
General Note:
"Based on the BBC television series with John Berger."

"Penguin art and architecture"--P. [4] of cover.
Language:
English
Added Author:
Added Uniform Title:
Ways of seeing (Television program)
ISBN:
9780140135152
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Central Library N7430.5 .W39C Adult Non-Fiction Non-Fiction Area
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Central Library N7430.5 .W39C Adult Non-Fiction Non-Fiction Area
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Central Library N7430.5 .W39C Adult Non-Fiction Non-Fiction Area
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Summary

Summary

John Berger's seminal text on how to look at art

John Berger's Ways of Seeing is one of the most stimulating and the most influential books on art in any language. First published in 1972, it was based on the BBC television series about which the Sunday Times critic commented: "This is an eye-opener in more ways than one: by concentrating on how we look at paintings . . . he will almost certainly change the way you look at pictures." By now he has.

"The influence of the series and the book . . . was enormous . . . It opened up for general attention to areas of cultural study that are now commonplace." --Geoff Dyer

"Berger has the ability to cut right through the mystification of the professional art critics . . . He is a liberator of images: and once we have allowed the paintings to work on us directly, we are in a much better position to make a meaningful evaluation." --Peter Fuller, Arts Review


Author Notes

John Peter Berger was born in London, England on November 5, 1926. After serving in the British Army from 1944 to 1946, he enrolled in the Chelsea School of Art. He began his career as a painter and exhibited work at a number of London galleries in the late 1940s. He then worked as an art critic for The New Statesman for a decade.

He wrote fiction and nonfiction including several volumes of art criticism. His novels include A Painter of Our Time, From A to X, and G., which won both the James Tait Black Memorial Prize and the Booker Prize in 1972. His other works include an essay collection entitled Permanent Red, Into Their Labors, and a book and television series entitled Ways of Seeing.

In the 1970s, he collaborated with the director Alain Tanner on three films. He wrote or co-wrote La Salamandre, The Middle of the World, and Jonah Who Will Be 25 in the Year 2000. He died on January 1, 2017 at the age of 90.

(Bowker Author Biography)


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