Cover image for Draw dinosaurs
Title:
Draw dinosaurs
Author:
DuBosque, D. C.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
Columbus, NC : Peel Productions, [1998]

©1998
Physical Description:
63 pages : illustrations ; 28 cm
Summary:
Provides step-by-step instructions for drawing dinosaurs one line at a time or for beginning with ovals, triangles, and solid forms.
General Note:
Revision of: c1993.

Includes index.
Language:
English
ISBN:
9780939217229
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Clarence Library NC780.5 .D83 1998 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Clearfield Library NC780.5 .D83 1998 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Eggertsville-Snyder Library NC780.5 .D83 1998 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Orchard Park Library NC780.5 .D83 1998 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Williamsville Library NC780.5 .D83 1998 Juvenile Non-Fiction Oversize
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Julia Boyer Reinstein Library NC780.5 .D83 1998 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Audubon Library NC780.5 .D83 1998 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Anna M. Reinstein Library NC780.5 .D83 1998 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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On Order

Summary

Summary

From initial concept to finished art, the "Learn to Draw" series provides young and beginning artists with practical step-by-step instruction in a warm, friendly voice.


Reviews 2

Booklist Review

Gr. 4-6. Practical advice and easy-to-follow directions are the highlights of this drawing primer. Budding artists are encouraged to use the blank sides of used paper and to try to keep a positive attitude. Instruction begins with basic line drawings and moves on to more complex techniques that produce more realistic looking creations. A brief line or two about each dinosaur and instructions on how to make a portfolio round out this user-friendly guide. ~--Denia Hester


School Library Journal Review

Gr 3-6-This step-by-step approach to pencil sketching begins with a list of basic supplies. Unlike Lee Ames's ``Draw 50'' series (Doubleday), DuBosque clarifies each step with a brief description of the technique. Frequent encouragements of ``Try it again, if it doesn't look right the first time'' add to the child appeal of this how-to book. Commencing with the drawing of dinosaurs using just a swoop of a line (linosaurs), students are guided through a progression of more difficult spacial relationships: ovalsaurs, trianglesaurs, solidsaurs. As each type of creature is sketched, different techniques are explained. The final chapter puts them all into play, with suggestions as to shading, points of perspective, and background detailing. Brief facts about real dinosaurs are provided in sidebars that include a pronunciation key; they are indexed by their scientific names. Directions for the construction of a portfolio are given, encouraging youngsters to practice and to save all of their work. DuBosque's How Do You Draw Dinosaurs? (Peel, 1989) is very wordy and has a less appealing format. Michael Emberly's Dinosuars! (Little, 1980) offers the step-by-step approach, but is not as simplified and lacks the explanatory narrative. Draw! Dinosaurs will be readily used by young artists on their own, with satisfying results.-Beth Irish, Orange Public Library, CA (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Table of Contents

Rods and jointsp. 4
How to make arms and legs look real!
Suppliesp. 6
What you need to start your dino-drawing adventures
Linosaursp. 7
For an easy start, draw one line at a time
Ovalsaursp. 21
For more flexibility, build from this basic shape
Trianglesaursp. 39
Sometimes, triangles will jump out at you. Draw them!
Solidsaursp. 51
For maximum effect, build forms into your drawing
Indexp. 63

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