Cover image for The spread of Islam
Title:
The spread of Islam
Author:
Swisher, Clarice, 1933-
Publication Information:
San Diego, Calif. : Greenhaven Press, [1999]

©1999
Physical Description:
240 pages ; 23 cm.
Language:
English
Contents:
The origin and growth of Islam in Arabia -- The East-West spread of Islam -- The spread of Islamic art and thought -- The spread of factions within Islam -- The modern-day resurgence of Islam.
ISBN:
9781565109674

9781565109667
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Central Library BP55 .S68 1999 Adult Non-Fiction Non-Fiction Area
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Central Library BP55 .S68 1999 Adult Non-Fiction Central Closed Stacks-Non circulating
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Central Library BP55 .S68 1999 Adult Non-Fiction Central Closed Stacks
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Summary

Summary

Conceived with a dedication to manifest destiny, individual freedom, and opportunity, the United States, from its inception, made an effort to avoid political or military involvement in Europe which could conflict with its pursuit of those goals. Ronald E. Powaski's study analyzes why the United States pursued this isolationist policy, and the factors, events, and personalities which challenged it and finally necessitated its abandonment.

Powaski's chronological approach to the topic begins with historical background material which identifies the origins of isolationism as a natural outgrowth of colonial ideals. The major portion of the text is devoted to how the political, military, and economic upheavals of the twentieth century gradually forced the United States to reevaluate its isolationist policy, ultimately reaffirming its original ideals through continuing involvement in world peace organizations. A list of suggested reading and a full index complete this work.


Summary

Conceived with a dedication to manifest destiny, individual freedom, and opportunity, the United States, from its inception, made an effort to avoid political or military involvement in Europe which could conflict with its pursuit of those goals. Ronald E. Powaski's study analyzes why the United States pursued this isolationist policy, and the factors, events, and personalities which challenged it and finally necessitated its abandonment.

Powaski's chronological approach to the topic begins with historical background material which identifies the origins of isolationism as a natural outgrowth of colonial ideals. The major portion of the text is devoted to how the political, military, and economic upheavals of the twentieth century gradually forced the United States to reevaluate its isolationist policy, ultimately reaffirming its original ideals through continuing involvement in world peace organizations. A list of suggested reading and a full index complete this work.


Reviews 2

Booklist Review

Gr. 9^-12. This collection of essays and book excerpts, part of the Turning Points in World History series, presents a view of Islam through mainly Western eyes. There are some stereotypes about "tribal life untouched by civilization" and "the Quran's preoccupation with battles, spoils and women," but the best writers are fair and informative, pointing out American misperceptions of the modern Islamic resurgence. An excellent essay discusses the problems of Muslim immigrants in the U.S. and American converts to Islam. Another writer describes the nature and causes of the current Islamic revival in the Middle East. Some of the best essays deal with Islamic literature and art, including religious inspiration through story and art, and the Islamic contributions to science and math. An appendix of original documents provides excerpts from the Koran and various personal perspectives, including a 1960 speech by Malcolm X. As one writer points out, these are subjects barely represented in most world history classrooms. --Hazel Rochman


Booklist Review

Gr. 9^-12. This collection of essays and book excerpts, part of the Turning Points in World History series, presents a view of Islam through mainly Western eyes. There are some stereotypes about "tribal life untouched by civilization" and "the Quran's preoccupation with battles, spoils and women," but the best writers are fair and informative, pointing out American misperceptions of the modern Islamic resurgence. An excellent essay discusses the problems of Muslim immigrants in the U.S. and American converts to Islam. Another writer describes the nature and causes of the current Islamic revival in the Middle East. Some of the best essays deal with Islamic literature and art, including religious inspiration through story and art, and the Islamic contributions to science and math. An appendix of original documents provides excerpts from the Koran and various personal perspectives, including a 1960 speech by Malcolm X. As one writer points out, these are subjects barely represented in most world history classrooms. --Hazel Rochman


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