Cover image for Not just a summer crush
Title:
Not just a summer crush
Author:
Adler, C. S. (Carole S.)
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
New York : Clarion Books, [1998]

©1998
Physical Description:
117 pages ; 22 cm
Summary:
A twelve-year-old girl develops a crush on her English teacher when he spends a week at a beach near her family's cottage.
Language:
English
Reading Level:
650 Lexile.
Program Information:
Accelerated Reader AR MG 4.4 3.0 32160.

Reading Counts RC 6-8 5.1 8 Quiz: 22746 Guided reading level: NR.
ISBN:
9780395885321
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
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Material Type
Home Location
Status
Central Library X Juvenile Fiction Central Closed Stacks
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Summary

Summary

Twelve-year-old Hana is anticipating a miserable summer, but when she discovers her favorite teacher, Mr. Crane--David--sitting alone on the beach, things suddenly start to get much better. Mr. Crane has come to Cape Cod to decide whether he should return to teaching in the fall. And, much to Hana's surprise, the young teacher actually values her opinion. Accustomed to being treated like a baby by her family, Hana blooms in the warmth of Mr. Crane's attention. But when her mother misinterprets her relationship with David Crane, Hana is forced to stand up for herself while dealing with her own strong and confusing feelings--a struggle that pays off in unexpected ways.


Author Notes

C. S. Adler is the author of many novels for young readers, including the recent One Unhappy Horse and Winning. She lives on Cape Cod and in Arizona.


Reviews 2

Booklist Review

Gr. 5^-7. The youngest of four kids, 12-year-old Hana feels taken for granted and overlooked, and she is often left alone as other family members pursue their own interests. So Hana is delighted when she runs into Mr. Crane, her last-semester teacher, at the beach. He's nice, fun to talk to, and gives her his undivided attention. Most important, he treats her as an equal; he confides in her and seeks her opinions, and she begins to develop a crush. But when her feelings are discovered, her mother rushes to end the situation, much to Hana's embarrassment. Although Hana and Mr. Crane's relationship never progresses beyond friendship, his confidences are quite personal--his teaching problems, insecurities, personal dreams, and uncertain future plans--though his intentions are not romantic. The book addresses the not-unusual occurrence of a teacher crush and the pangs of first love with compassion; readers will understand the differing ways in which the relationship is viewed by Hana, her mother, and Mr. Crane, and the importance of open family dialogue, inclusion, and trust. --Shelle Rosenfeld


School Library Journal Review

Gr 5-8-At 12, Hana Riley considers herself to be the "afterthought" of her family: born last, left to do whatever chores no one else is willing to shoulder, perceived by her parents as an incompetent baby. During the Rileys's annual summer vacation to Cape Cod, she meets up with her sixth-grade English teacher, a young man who had trouble maintaining order in the classroom. Hana, however, had liked Mr. Crane as a teacher and feels something more than pupil-like affection for him now that school is out and he has asked her to call him David. Her parents and siblings read nefarious motives into David's attention to Hana, although she-and readers-can't see anything sleazy in his behavior. After Mrs. Riley tells him to stop spending time with her daughter, Hana sneaks off to say good-bye to him, and then admits that she has done so. Suddenly, all of the family members see her in a new and more favorable light. Readers are left wondering what was so wrong in the first place, both with Hana and with David's apparently wholesome and understandable behavior. Adler paints some interesting characters here, including the teenaged brother who manipulates those around him, but the story is told rather than shown and the characters never become sympathetic beings. Hana's parents' message seems to be that teachers are to be seen only as classroom functionaries and not as real people.-Francisca Goldsmith, Berkeley Public Library, CA (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


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