Cover image for Powwow : a good day to dance
Title:
Powwow : a good day to dance
Author:
Greene, Jacqueline Dembar.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
New York : Franklin Watts, [1998]

©1998
Physical Description:
63 pages : color illustrations ; 23 cm.
Summary:
Follows the activities of a young boy as his family attends a Wampanoag powwow, describing the significance of some of the events at the gathering, particularly the dances.
Language:
English
Reading Level:
960 Lexile.
Program Information:
Accelerated Reader AR UG 6.1 1.0 27103.

Reading Counts RC 6-8 6.2 4 Quiz: 28050 Guided reading level: V.
ISBN:
9780531203378

9780531159262
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Audubon Library E98.P86 G74 1998 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Summary

Summary

This highly praised series of books has been in print since the 1950s (launched originally by Franklin Watts himself). Today's First Books provide engaging, in-depth introductions to subjects in all areas of the middle-grade curriculum, including science, social studies, and the arts.

Illustrated with color and historical photography and art, each First Book is chaptered, includes an index, a for-further-reading list and, where appropriate, a glossary and original maps.


Summary

The books in the highly praised First Books series provide basic facts on subjects in the social studies, the sciences, sports, and practical and fine arts.


Reviews 4

Booklist Review

Gr. 4^-6. For 10-year-old Little Man, the annual Wampanoag powwow in eastern Massachusetts is a time for dancing, telling stories, and renewing old friendships. Every year from April through October, Little Man and his family travel the powwow circuit, selling their handmade craft items and celebrating their culture with family and friends. Numerous color photos show Little Man participating in the festivities, the elaborate costumes worn by the men and women, and the dancers performing the intricate steps of traditional or exhibition dances. Although smaller in format than George Ancona's Powwow (1993), it covers much of the same material, adding sidebars on the Wampanoag tribe, drum groups, origins of the jingle dress, and powwow manners. Glossary. --Karen Hutt


School Library Journal Review

Gr 3-5‘Little Man is a 10-year-old Native American who "travels the powwow trail" with his family. They attend these gatherings in the eastern states on weekends from April to October, selling crafts, socializing, and participating in the dancing. By centering this volume on an actual child at a Wampanoag powwow, Greene is able to relate many details and describe the event in a personal way. The attractively organized book is filled with full-color photographs. Fact boxes are interspersed throughout to highlight various subjects, from jingle dresses to powwow manners. A useful glossary is appended, along with online sources. While this title is more informative than Terry Behrens's Powwow (Children's, 1983), it contains much the same information found in George Ancona's Powwow (Harcourt, 1993) and Robert Crum's Eagle Drum (S & S, 1994). The notable difference is that Crum and Ancona discuss powwows held in Montana, and Greene focuses on one in Massachusetts. While all of the gatherings are similar, interesting regional differences are described. Any one of these three titles would be a good selection; together, they provide an intriguing range of personal perspectives.‘Darcy Schild, Schwegler Elementary School, Lawrence, KS (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Booklist Review

Gr. 4^-6. For 10-year-old Little Man, the annual Wampanoag powwow in eastern Massachusetts is a time for dancing, telling stories, and renewing old friendships. Every year from April through October, Little Man and his family travel the powwow circuit, selling their handmade craft items and celebrating their culture with family and friends. Numerous color photos show Little Man participating in the festivities, the elaborate costumes worn by the men and women, and the dancers performing the intricate steps of traditional or exhibition dances. Although smaller in format than George Ancona's Powwow (1993), it covers much of the same material, adding sidebars on the Wampanoag tribe, drum groups, origins of the jingle dress, and powwow manners. Glossary. --Karen Hutt


School Library Journal Review

Gr 3-5‘Little Man is a 10-year-old Native American who "travels the powwow trail" with his family. They attend these gatherings in the eastern states on weekends from April to October, selling crafts, socializing, and participating in the dancing. By centering this volume on an actual child at a Wampanoag powwow, Greene is able to relate many details and describe the event in a personal way. The attractively organized book is filled with full-color photographs. Fact boxes are interspersed throughout to highlight various subjects, from jingle dresses to powwow manners. A useful glossary is appended, along with online sources. While this title is more informative than Terry Behrens's Powwow (Children's, 1983), it contains much the same information found in George Ancona's Powwow (Harcourt, 1993) and Robert Crum's Eagle Drum (S & S, 1994). The notable difference is that Crum and Ancona discuss powwows held in Montana, and Greene focuses on one in Massachusetts. While all of the gatherings are similar, interesting regional differences are described. Any one of these three titles would be a good selection; together, they provide an intriguing range of personal perspectives.‘Darcy Schild, Schwegler Elementary School, Lawrence, KS (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


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